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"Resource Allocation" and Saves

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:57 am
by tuckerman85
I just wanted to link everyone to this article I just read at The Hardball Times. It's basically the strategy I've employed for the past few years, but they were able to give sound reason to why the strategy works.

http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/fantasy/article/draft-strategy-closers-are-overrated/

What are people's thoughts?

Re: "Resource Allocation" and Saves

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 12:59 pm
by RugbyD
agree and disagree.

as the article mentions, a critical issue is how easy it is to pick up saves off the WW. If you can't be in constant contact with the markets, it is worth your while to shore up some saves in the draft.

I think there are definitely guys worth a high-ish pick b/c they are 'safe bets'. By that I mean guys with a proven track record and a low-risk style that reduces the chance of injury. Guys I would put in that category:
Hoffman
Paps
Saito
Nathan
Rivera

I have not watched Putz enough to judge his delivery and Wagner is wearing down by his own admission.

Re: "Resource Allocation" and Saves

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:12 pm
by tuckerman85
I think that is reasonable.. I'm not saying I don't draft any closers, I just prefer to wait for the guys you just mentioned. I love Saito, but he does have Broxton sitting right behind him, so I'm not sure I'd put him in the same group.

Re: "Resource Allocation" and Saves

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:18 pm
by Giambis
RugbyD wrote:agree and disagree.

as the article mentions, a critical issue is how easy it is to pick up saves off the WW. If you can't be in constant contact with the markets, it is worth your while to shore up some saves in the draft.

I think there are definitely guys worth a high-ish pick b/c they are 'safe bets'. By that I mean guys with a proven track record and a low-risk style that reduces the chance of injury. Guys I would put in that category:
Hoffman
Paps
Saito
Nathan
Rivera

I have not watched Putz enough to judge his delivery and Wagner is wearing down by his own admission.


I agree, Carty's article seems premised on there being some sort of omnipotent ability to get closers off the wire as they become available. I think his leagues use some waiver system for all their pickups, but I know my yahoo leagues don't, so there's no gurantee that I'll pick up the next Corpas, etc. I think the top flight closers are still valuable for their consistency.

The potentially more interesting unaddressed issue in his article (if I recall), is the extent to which a waiver system like his should be utilized throughout the season toward picking up relief pitchers, while allowing the draft to handle starters and offense. something like "Resource allocation for waiver systems."