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Someone Explain This To Me Please

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Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby thatguy27 » Sun May 13, 2012 6:57 pm

How can a pitcher get the loss when he gives up fewer runs than his team scores?

This happened today with Lance Lynn. He gave up 3 runs, the Cards, scored 4. So, had the bullpen done it's job, the Cards would have won. instead, the Cards end with losing and Lynn gets the loss. Shouldn't the pitcher who let up the go ahead run (or at least, the run that led to the opposition having more runs than the losing team) get the loss. The same situation happened earlier in the season with Jordan Zimmerman, I believe. So, that's the dig-dang-dealio?
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby bigh0rt » Sun May 13, 2012 7:00 pm

thatguy27 wrote:How can a pitcher get the loss when he gives up fewer runs than his team scores?

This happened today with Lance Lynn. He gave up 3 runs, the Cards, scored 4. So, had the bullpen done it's job, the Cards would have won. instead, the Cards end with losing and Lynn gets the loss. Shouldn't the pitcher who let up the go ahead run (or at least, the run that led to the opposition having more runs than the losing team) get the loss. The same situation happened earlier in the season with Jordan Zimmerman, I believe. So, that's the dig-dang-dealio?
Because when the pitcher was removed from the game, his team was trailing, and while his team may have scored more runs than he ultimately let up, his team was never able to overcome the deficit he left them with when he exited the game. In order for a pitcher to get off the hook for a Loss, his team must tie the game or take the lead after he is removed from the game.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby thatguy27 » Sun May 13, 2012 7:58 pm

bigh0rt wrote:
thatguy27 wrote:How can a pitcher get the loss when he gives up fewer runs than his team scores?

This happened today with Lance Lynn. He gave up 3 runs, the Cards, scored 4. So, had the bullpen done it's job, the Cards would have won. instead, the Cards end with losing and Lynn gets the loss. Shouldn't the pitcher who let up the go ahead run (or at least, the run that led to the opposition having more runs than the losing team) get the loss. The same situation happened earlier in the season with Jordan Zimmerman, I believe. So, that's the dig-dang-dealio?
Because when the pitcher was removed from the game, his team was trailing, and while his team may have scored more runs than he ultimately let up, his team was never able to overcome the deficit he left them with when he exited the game. In order for a pitcher to get off the hook for a Loss, his team must tie the game or take the lead after he is removed from the game.


Thanks for the explanation. I for one am not fond of the rule, but I suppose it sort of makes sense.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby A Fleshner Fantasy » Mon May 14, 2012 5:39 am

thatguy27 wrote:
bigh0rt wrote:
thatguy27 wrote:How can a pitcher get the loss when he gives up fewer runs than his team scores?

This happened today with Lance Lynn. He gave up 3 runs, the Cards, scored 4. So, had the bullpen done it's job, the Cards would have won. instead, the Cards end with losing and Lynn gets the loss. Shouldn't the pitcher who let up the go ahead run (or at least, the run that led to the opposition having more runs than the losing team) get the loss. The same situation happened earlier in the season with Jordan Zimmerman, I believe. So, that's the dig-dang-dealio?
Because when the pitcher was removed from the game, his team was trailing, and while his team may have scored more runs than he ultimately let up, his team was never able to overcome the deficit he left them with when he exited the game. In order for a pitcher to get off the hook for a Loss, his team must tie the game or take the lead after he is removed from the game.


Thanks for the explanation. I for one am not fond of the rule, but I suppose it sort of makes sense.


It definitely makes sense. In this scenario, every pitcher that pitched gave up fewer runs than their team scored, and someone has to get the loss. It's not necessarily more fair to give it to a random reliever who happened to give up a run or two.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby thatguy27 » Mon May 14, 2012 4:29 pm

You make an excellent argument regarding just who the fault should ultimately lie with. However, I can envision some situations in which this rule would really be unfair. Say a pitcher leaves trailing 2-1. A reliever comes in and promptly allow 10 runs. The losing pitchers teams makes comeback, scoring say 8 runs, but falls short. The starter gets the loss, the reliever does not. Is that fair?
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby Ender » Mon May 14, 2012 4:43 pm

Wins are Losses are just worthless stats. For fantasy draft guys who go deep in games and play on good teams if you want to chase them but from a real player value just ignore them.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby A Fleshner Fantasy » Tue May 15, 2012 7:20 am

thatguy27 wrote:You make an excellent argument regarding just who the fault should ultimately lie with. However, I can envision some situations in which this rule would really be unfair. Say a pitcher leaves trailing 2-1. A reliever comes in and promptly allow 10 runs. The losing pitchers teams makes comeback, scoring say 8 runs, but falls short. The starter gets the loss, the reliever does not. Is that fair?


For almost any stat, I could give you a counterexample of when it isn't fair, but when you're generalizing something to make a rule about it, you have to accept that. Of course that scenario isn't fair, but generalizations don't work when thinking of extreme cases.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby Rally Cat » Sat May 19, 2012 10:16 am

Another rule that isn't fair to pitchers in INTENTIAL walks. The pitcher is charged with the walk and it isn't his fault.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby Ursa » Sat May 19, 2012 4:24 pm

Rally Cat wrote:Another rule that isn't fair to pitchers in INTENTIAL walks. The pitcher is charged with the walk and it isn't his fault.


I agree. However, pitchers get away with HBP (which to me is a walk) and also can claim unearned runs when it's their error that caused them.
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Re: Someone Explain This To Me Please

Postby Rally Cat » Sat May 19, 2012 6:17 pm

True Good point ;-D
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