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How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

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How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby Phatferd » Tue May 27, 2008 6:02 pm

What is the best place (other than craigslist) to search or find houses (not apts) for rent. I'm looking to move out with 3 other guys and rent a 4 bedroom house.

We are all 24-26 years old, so I am a little worried about that aspect. I'm thinking it will be pretty difficult to find a place where the landlord will be happy to see 4 young men moving into his investment. Also, how does it usually work in terms of how much combined income a landlord will look for when renting out a house. Say rent is $2500 for a 4 bedroom, will the landlord basically want a combined income of $10k a month.

One more thing. One of my friends who is moving in has really bad credit. He got himself into a lot of debt while in college (credit cards, not loans) and he has just started working on it. He has enough money to pay his portion of rent, but his credit is crap. Can he have a co-signer for his portion of the rent, or does that co-signer become responsible for all of our rent?
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Re: How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby Big Pimpin » Tue May 27, 2008 6:51 pm

There's always rentals.com which has listings all over. Just Googling "rental houses phoenix" pops up a bunch of options for me, with various realty company listings. Also, if you know a realtor, then you can go that way too. Rental properties are listed on MLS too, so that's a good way to narrow down your search if you know how much you want to pay and the area that you're looking. You should be able to search as narrow or broad as you want to doing that. The bonus there is that the realtor does the legwork and helps you find what you want but you don't owe anything, the property owner ends up kicking the realtor some coin for his/her trouble. That's the typical arrangement anyway. We know a realtor and he helped us find a great house last time we looked to rent and I'd absolutely recommend that course of action.

I don't know anything about your other questions, but a realtor probably would. I'd go that route if you or one of your friends or a parent knows somebody in real estate. ;-D
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Re: How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby RugbyD » Tue May 27, 2008 9:35 pm

realtor.com has rental listings.

by law the landlord is not allowed to discriminate against you based on age/sex/marital status, but of course there are ways around that, such as denying you the lease b/c of your friend's credit. if you do run into some resistance, offer to put down a higher security deposit or something just to put their mind at ease more.
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Re: How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby wake » Tue May 27, 2008 10:38 pm

RugbyD wrote:realtor.com has rental listings.

by law the landlord is not allowed to discriminate against you based on age/sex/marital status, but of course there are ways around that, such as denying you the lease b/c of your friend's credit. if you do run into some resistance, offer to put down a higher security deposit or something just to put their mind at ease more.


I don't think age/marital status/ and sexual orientation discrimination are included in the federals Fair Housing Act. If not, it would depend on the state on whether it's allowed.

As for the other question, I'm not an expert so someone would have to back me up on it. However, if one's person credit might be a problem, I believe you can sign one lease in which the landlord could go after any of you if one of you doesn't pay the rent. If you're allowed individual leases, I believe you can have a co-signer who would be responsible if your roommate didn't pay rent. It's been awhile since I've dealt with renting though so I could be wrong.
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Re: How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby Lofunzo » Wed May 28, 2008 2:07 am

I have my license but it is here in NJ. It has been some time since I searched for rentals but the local paper is a good place to look as well. As for your 4th guy with bad credit, it all depends on how much you trust him. If you do, leave him off the papers. This is in addition to the earlier advice.
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Re: How to find a house to rent? Also, questions about renting

Postby knapplc » Wed May 28, 2008 8:55 am

Who is THIS ^^^ GUY?!?!?? How's it going, Lo?



The federal Fair Housing Act does not prevent discrimination based on age, and if it did it would mirror the ADEA (Age Discrimination in Employment Act) which prohibits discriminating against persons older than 40, meaning that it's perfectly legal to refuse to rent to someone because they are in their 20s. The FHA covers the bases of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, familial status and retaliation. Familial status means whether or not the renter/buyer/lessee has children, in which case you may not discriminate against them based on their kids. Retaliation means that you have reported the landlord/property owner for doing something illegal or you have filed charges against them in the past, and because of that they retaliate against you.

My experience investigating housing discrimination has been that 95%-99% of landlords/property owners are good, solid, honest people who will treat you right. That other 1%-5% are really nasty, though, because unlike the work world, housing is our private time, and for some reason they feel like it's much more covered up, therefore they can do more. Check the BBB, check any housing forums you might have in your community, and overall just educate yourself about the landlord as much as possible.

Phatferd wrote:We are all 24-26 years old, so I am a little worried about that aspect. I'm thinking it will be pretty difficult to find a place where the landlord will be happy to see 4 young men moving into his investment. Also, how does it usually work in terms of how much combined income a landlord will look for when renting out a house. Say rent is $2500 for a 4 bedroom, will the landlord basically want a combined income of $10k a month.

This is a legitimate concern, but maybe not as tough as you think. When you meet the landlord, dress well. Wear a shirt and tie, and be on your best behavior. That first impression is golden.

Phatferd wrote:One more thing. One of my friends who is moving in has really bad credit. He got himself into a lot of debt while in college (credit cards, not loans) and he has just started working on it. He has enough money to pay his portion of rent, but his credit is crap. Can he have a co-signer for his portion of the rent, or does that co-signer become responsible for all of our rent?

This is certainly no guarantee, but typically the type of landlord who owns two-three houses that he/she rents out to college-age folks is not going to check credit scores. This is slowly changing, but it has been my experience that this kind of fact-checking is rare for these smaller landlords. So this may be less of a problem than you might think. If you were going into a larger area like a townhouse community or an apartment complex I'd say it's almost guaranteed that they do this, but it's not typical of small landlords. If they check his history and find he has bad credit, then you can introduce the co-signer for his portion of the rent, but you need to make it clear up front that the co-signer is ONLY paying for his portion of the rent.
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