Getting HD Over the Air - Fantasy Baseball Cafe 2015 Fantasy Baseball Cafe
100% Deposit Bonus for Cafe Members!

Return to General Talk

Getting HD Over the Air

Moderator: Baseball Moderators

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby Lofunzo » Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:49 pm

StlSluggers wrote:
Lofunzo wrote:
That's the coax I need to connect the antenna to the TV, right?

Yes. It's the standard cable wire used in the industry now. The ones that they keep on hand in the payment center are usually just long enough to go from a cable box to a TV.

Yeah, I've noticed. The cable they put in my new house isn't nearly long enough for our basement hook up. I was going to have to extend it, and before this weekend when we have people over.


Pick up some pizza and crackers and I'll take care of it. ;-D

Let me know if you need anything and I can take care of it.
Image
Lofunzo
Moderator
Moderator

User avatar
ModeratorCafeholicFantasy ExpertCafe RankerEagle EyeHockey ModPick 3 Weekly Winner
Posts: 23698
(Past Year: 11)
Joined: 9 Jul 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Central Jersey

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby StlSluggers » Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:55 pm

Lofunzo wrote:Let me know if you need anything and I can take care of it.

I appreciate the offer...

Lofunzo wrote:Pick up some pizza and crackers and I'll take care of it. ;-D

...and so does she. :-b
StlSluggers
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicCafe WriterMock(ing) DrafterWeb Supporter
Posts: 14716
Joined: 24 May 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Parking in the gov't bldg @ 7th and Pine. It's only $3.00 on game day!

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby Phatferd » Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:58 pm

go to http://www.monoprice.com for anything electronic accessory related. I got an HDMI cable (10 ft) for $5 and it works like a charm. Saved myself a lot of money over those overpriced Monster cables.

Here is the RG-6 F type 12ft cable http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10216&cs_id=1021603&p_id=3032&seq=1&format=2 if you need a different length just scroll to the bottom of this page and it has the other sizes.

I have purchased 3 things from them and my friend has as well, they are very reliable.
You have no frame of reference, Donny. You're like a child who walks into the middle of a movie...
Phatferd
General Manager
General Manager

User avatar

Posts: 4058
Joined: 6 Feb 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Highway 10

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby slomo007 » Tue Oct 23, 2007 2:04 pm

StlSluggers wrote:
Lofunzo wrote:JT.......If you have trouble finding an RG-6 jumper, I can make 1 for you. Don't go for that Radio Shack crap. If you have any service with your cable company, you could also go to the local payment center and pick 1 up. You are screwed on length, though, because they are all premade and are only a few feet.

That's the coax I need to connect the antenna to the TV, right?

Slomo, I found this article today. I understand what it's saying. It was just a different way of looking at "hd" antennas...

No Such Thing as an HDTV Antenna

Over-the-air (OTA) HDTV is a big hit these days. High definition television is one on those rare services that comes in the highest quality when it is free of charge. You can watch amazing 1080i resolution broadcasts over the air for free, and get better quality for the same channels than through a paid satellite DTV subscription. All you need is a high definition TV set with a built-in HDTV tuner and an off-air HDTV antenna.

Do you know what HDTV antenna is? If you do, forget it immediately. There is no such thing.

Do you know what a regular antenna is? Antenna is a piece of metal designed to resonate at a specific frequency and to be responsive over a range of frequencies. TV antennas are designed to work either in the range of Ultra High Frequencies (UHF), Very High Frequencies (VHF) or both. Any station transmitting within an antenna bandwidth, i.e. the VHF/UHF frequency range, can be picked up by the antenna and transferred to the TV set.

All television broadcasts, digital and analog, high definition and standard definition, take place in the VHF and the UHF bands. What make a signal to be HD is its content, the way a signal is modulated, and not the carrier frequency it is transmitted on. On the contrary, for antenna only the frequency matters.

There is nothing specific about a TV antenna that is used to receive HD signals. Your antenna doesn't really care whether the signal is high definition or not. It has absolutely no idea what the signal resolution is, or whether the signal is analog or digital. The antenna doesn't care that you are receiving HDTV as it doesn't care whether you are watching Fox News or NBC channel.

Okay, may be I oversimplify the matters. There is a little bit more to it. Besides the bandwidth there are few additional electrical and spatial properties a good antenna must have. Most notably, directivity, high front-to-back (F/B) ratio and low-noise amplification in case the antenna comes with an amplifier. Does anything of these matter from the analog vs. HDTV reception perspective?

There is a wrong, yet widespread belief that you need more powerful antenna in terms of directivity and amplification in order to receive digital television. I don't know where the hell this belief comes from, cause the situation is exactly the opposite. HDTV is much more noise immune than the analog television and can produce high quality video at significantly lower signal-to-noise ratios. So in principle, if analog and digital stations transmitted at the same power, you would need less antenna gain and could tolerate higher noise levels to receive error free digital TV. In reality, networks exploit the inherent noise immunity of the digital TV to transmit HDTV signal at reduced power. All in all, antennas with similar directivity/gain properties should receive analog and digital broadcasts equally well.

The other important specification, F/B ratio, has to do with the antenna ability to receive a signal coming towards its front from the direction the antenna points to, and to reject a signal coming from behind. In the presence of tall buildings or other reflective structures, the signal travels from the towers to the antenna by multiple paths, each path arrives at a different time instant. The multipath phenomena is responsible for a "ghost" creation in analog television. A desirable property of the antenna is to receive a single strongest replica of the signal coming through the strongest path and to reject the weak replicas. The higher F/B ratio is, the better is multipath rejection (ghost suppression). Without going into technical details, we must say that HDTV signal is a bit more sensitive to multipath phenomena cause it has slightly larger bandwidth. Such a difference in multipath sensitivity is negligibly small. Most directional, old fashioned and cheap TV antenna has F/B ratio good enough to handle HDTV signal. If an antenna can handle an analog signal, it can handle a digital signal as well.

You may ask why there are so many "HDTV antennas" on the market. HDTV is a fancy buzzword. HDTV is cool. It sells. HDTV antenna is nothing but a hype. Don't be fooled by the ubiquitous ads promoting HDTV antennas and HDTV optimized antennas. These antennas are HDTV antennas indeed, but to no lesser extent they are "SDTV antennas", "EDTV antennas" and "NTSC antennas". Let's say all of them are just TV antennas.

When choosing an antenna for HDTV, check the really important parameters such as directivity, gain, F/B ratio. These specifications are important for reception of both, digital and analog broadcasts. Consult our step-by-step HDTV antenna selection guide and read antenna reviews. The HDTV optimization is probably the least important factor you should take into account.

I thought it was interesting where it said, "In reality, networks exploit the inherent noise immunity of the digital TV to transmit HDTV signal at reduced power."


Figures, those cheap asses. B-)

Sounds like you're on the right track. There is a big difference in antennas though so I'd suggest going to the antennaweb.org site I mentioned and using it to tell you the distance in miles to your main network stations (CBS, NBC, Playboy, etc). After doing that, post the results here and I can recommend an antenna, if you're still interested in going through with this.
slomo007
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicEagle Eye
Posts: 11960
Joined: 31 May 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby StlSluggers » Tue Oct 23, 2007 2:31 pm

Sorry... I missed the part where you asked me to post the results:

* yellow - uhf KSDK-DT 5.1 NBC ST. LOUIS MO 126° 20.6 35
* yellow - uhf KTVI-DT 2.1 FOX St. Louis MO 135° 20.3 43
* yellow - uhf KDNL-DT 30.1 ABC ST. LOUIS MO 124° 20.2 31
* red - uhf KPLR-DT 11.1 CW ST. LOUIS MO 124° 20.6 26
* red - uhf KMOV-DT 4.1 CBS ST. LOUIS MO 128° 23.5 56
* blue - uhf KETC-DT 9.1 PBS ST. LOUIS MO 144° 22.2 39
* blue - uhf KNLC-DT 24.1 FMN ST. LOUIS MO 169° 26.8 14
* violet - uhf WRBU-DT 46.1 MNT E. ST. LOUIS IL 161° 25.8 47
StlSluggers
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicCafe WriterMock(ing) DrafterWeb Supporter
Posts: 14716
Joined: 24 May 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Parking in the gov't bldg @ 7th and Pine. It's only $3.00 on game day!

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby slomo007 » Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:17 pm

You're in good shape....anything less than 25 miles isn't too tough...it looks like all of your major networks are in this range.

Do you have an attic that you could put the antenna in? If you can, and don't mind a little extra work, it's the best solution because you can get a larger antenna and then also you won't have to look at it in your family room.

If not, there are all sorts of indoor antennas but I haven't been lucky enough to find one that works for me (30 miles away). I had to end up putting a larger one in the attic. In your case, an indoor antenna might work. Thisindoor antenna is widely regarded as the best is also pretty cheap...so you're in luck.

Also you're lucky because all of your locals appear to be UHF and not VHF. I've had a helluva time getting my one VHF station working reliably (ABC) while all others are UHF. Ended up buying another antenna.
slomo007
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicEagle Eye
Posts: 11960
Joined: 31 May 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby StlSluggers » Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:36 pm

slomo007 wrote:You're in good shape....anything less than 25 miles isn't too tough...it looks like all of your major networks are in this range.

Do you have an attic that you could put the antenna in? If you can, and don't mind a little extra work, it's the best solution because you can get a larger antenna and then also you won't have to look at it in your family room.

If not, there are all sorts of indoor antennas but I haven't been lucky enough to find one that works for me (30 miles away). I had to end up putting a larger one in the attic. In your case, an indoor antenna might work. Thisindoor antenna is widely regarded as the best is also pretty cheap...so you're in luck.

Also you're lucky because all of your locals appear to be UHF and not VHF. I've had a helluva time getting my one VHF station working reliably (ABC) while all others are UHF. Ended up buying another antenna.

I might actually be able to put it in the attic there. I have a good problem in that the previous owners put in a ton of insulation. My HVAC bill on a 2,100-sq ft ranch is less than my bill from my last 900-sq ft ranch. Amazing. The downside is that I have to dig through 2+ feet of insulation every time I want to do anything upstairs. Luckily, this TV is situated on a wall that is right next to the attic access, so it might be very doable.
StlSluggers
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicCafe WriterMock(ing) DrafterWeb Supporter
Posts: 14716
Joined: 24 May 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Parking in the gov't bldg @ 7th and Pine. It's only $3.00 on game day!

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby slomo007 » Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:40 pm

StlSluggers wrote:
slomo007 wrote:You're in good shape....anything less than 25 miles isn't too tough...it looks like all of your major networks are in this range.

Do you have an attic that you could put the antenna in? If you can, and don't mind a little extra work, it's the best solution because you can get a larger antenna and then also you won't have to look at it in your family room.

If not, there are all sorts of indoor antennas but I haven't been lucky enough to find one that works for me (30 miles away). I had to end up putting a larger one in the attic. In your case, an indoor antenna might work. Thisindoor antenna is widely regarded as the best is also pretty cheap...so you're in luck.

Also you're lucky because all of your locals appear to be UHF and not VHF. I've had a helluva time getting my one VHF station working reliably (ABC) while all others are UHF. Ended up buying another antenna.

I might actually be able to put it in the attic there. I have a good problem in that the previous owners put in a ton of insulation. My HVAC bill on a 2,100-sq ft ranch is less than my bill from my last 900-sq ft ranch. Amazing. The downside is that I have to dig through 2+ feet of insulation every time I want to do anything upstairs. Luckily, this TV is situated on a wall that is right next to the attic access, so it might be very doable.


Have you ever run wall wiring before? It's not tough but requires some drywall cutting. If so, an antenna like this will definitely give you enough range. I have one like this just sitting in my attic, not mounted or anything. It works pretty well from 30+ miles so in your case I don't think you'll have any issues at all.
slomo007
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicEagle Eye
Posts: 11960
Joined: 31 May 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby StlSluggers » Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:48 pm

slomo007 wrote:
StlSluggers wrote:
slomo007 wrote:You're in good shape....anything less than 25 miles isn't too tough...it looks like all of your major networks are in this range.

Do you have an attic that you could put the antenna in? If you can, and don't mind a little extra work, it's the best solution because you can get a larger antenna and then also you won't have to look at it in your family room.

If not, there are all sorts of indoor antennas but I haven't been lucky enough to find one that works for me (30 miles away). I had to end up putting a larger one in the attic. In your case, an indoor antenna might work. Thisindoor antenna is widely regarded as the best is also pretty cheap...so you're in luck.

Also you're lucky because all of your locals appear to be UHF and not VHF. I've had a helluva time getting my one VHF station working reliably (ABC) while all others are UHF. Ended up buying another antenna.

I might actually be able to put it in the attic there. I have a good problem in that the previous owners put in a ton of insulation. My HVAC bill on a 2,100-sq ft ranch is less than my bill from my last 900-sq ft ranch. Amazing. The downside is that I have to dig through 2+ feet of insulation every time I want to do anything upstairs. Luckily, this TV is situated on a wall that is right next to the attic access, so it might be very doable.


Have you ever run wall wiring before? It's not tough but requires some drywall cutting. If so, an antenna like this will definitely give you enough range. I have one like this just sitting in my attic, not mounted or anything. It works pretty well from 30+ miles so in your case I don't think you'll have any issues at all.

Wow! That thing's a beast. 8-o

I'll save you my list of accomplishments since I've moved in. Let's just say that this job would be a walk in park compared to the three lighting jobs I did in my house. I would actually welcome work this easy.

Thanks for all the recommendations. My wife will think this is stupid, but sports in HD are sooooo freakin' sweet. :-L
StlSluggers
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicCafe WriterMock(ing) DrafterWeb Supporter
Posts: 14716
Joined: 24 May 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Parking in the gov't bldg @ 7th and Pine. It's only $3.00 on game day!

Re: Getting HD Over the Air

Postby slomo007 » Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:52 pm

StlSluggers wrote:I'll save you my list of accomplishments since I've moved in. Let's just say that this job would be a walk in park compared to the three lighting jobs I did in my house. I would actually welcome work this easy.

Thanks for all the recommendations. My wife will think this is stupid, but sports in HD are sooooo freakin' sweet. :-L


I've never been brave enough to screw with electrical projects before but I have no problems running coax cable...you're right it's simple.

As for the size, that picture is kind of deceiving...it's about 3 ft x 3 ft. Once you start watching sports in HD you will want to stop watching standard definition channels altogether.
slomo007
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicEagle Eye
Posts: 11960
Joined: 31 May 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

PreviousNext

Return to General Talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron
Forums Articles & Tips Sleepers Rankings Leagues


  • Fantasy Baseball
  • Article Submissions
  • Privacy Statement
  • Site Survey 
  • Contact