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HGH doesn't improve an athlete's performance

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HGH doesn't improve an athlete's performance

Postby George_Foreman » Mon May 07, 2007 1:03 am

Just in case anyone was wondering, there's no evidence that HGH improves an athlete's performance.

I just wish some of the blow-hards in the media who go on and on and on about how this is ruining baseball and everything would bother actually looking at what HGH actually does rather than flaping their jaws.
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Postby wrveres » Mon May 07, 2007 1:42 am

Solid reads ..

thanks for sharing those.
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Re: HGH doesn't improve an athlete's performance

Postby Midnight_Toker » Mon May 07, 2007 2:11 am

George_Foreman wrote:Just in case anyone was wondering, there's no evidence that HGH improves an athlete's performance.

I just wish some of the blow-hards in the media who go on and on and on about how this is ruining baseball and everything would bother actually looking at what HGH actually does rather than flaping their jaws.


You are correct sir, HGH isn't a performance enhancer at all, and users will not add dramatic muscle mass either.

However, HGH's growth promoting effects do strengthen connective tissues, cartilage, and tendons.

HGH is actually a great tool in recovering from injury.
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Postby jfg » Mon May 07, 2007 3:38 am

Yeah, HGH is all about injury prevention and recovery. So, I don't think I have a problem with it. I don't think anyone has a right to tell a person how to deal with an injury. If something is preventing somebody from doing their job they shouldn't be frowned upon for doing something about it.
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Postby RynMan » Mon May 07, 2007 5:27 am

Interesting read, GF.
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Postby knapplc » Mon May 07, 2007 9:03 am

And HGH tastes terrible, too. You can't put it on a cracker at all. :-P
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Postby jnormy » Mon May 07, 2007 9:32 am

Here are a couple of other interesting reads on the subject, from a slightly different angle but no less scientific (for all the bluster about truth and facts in the scientific community, it seems scientists often have a harder time agreeing on things than theologians do, lol):

http://www.science.org.au/nova/055/055key.htm

http://www.ontariogenomics.ca/education/episode5.asp

Bottom line, IMO: I don't think you'll ever be able to prove OR disprove whether or not HGH enhances athletic performance. No doubt it's different in that respect than steroids.

HGH is scientifically proven to increase strength, which is only one of many factors in assessing athletes in any sport. It doesn't help a baseball player make contact with the ball, but it stands to reason that if said player is stronger, he'll most likely hit it farther when he does get ahold of it. Same goes for a pitcher reaching back for that extra something on his fastball. He still must have the ability to throw strikes, but the added strength and energy late in a game can add some pop to that pitch.

I don't think HGH is something that can be policed in sports at this point though. There are too many other lines that would have to be drawn (caffeine, pain killers, etc.). If these guys want to risk diabetes or other such nasty complications later on in life to help their careers now, they're all adults. So be it.
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Postby josebach » Mon May 07, 2007 9:33 am

Seems to me like this is just one article. Isn't their opinion in the vast minority?

Even if you assume every article you read about it is completely untrustworthy, the fact that so many athletes take it is a pretty darn good indicator that it works. If it didn't work, they'd go on to something else.

To me it seems like common sense.
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Postby shasty mcnasty » Mon May 07, 2007 9:54 am

i do think it's interesting that that main line we hear from the media on this stuff generally does not give you the take found in that original link...sensationalism sells, right? On the other hand, i think the fact that MLB and the Olympics ban HGH does have some bearing on the discussion of whether or not this is a substance that can improve athletic performance. I mean, why would they ban it if it couldn't be used to unfairly gain an athletic advantage? I'm sure part of it is being precautionary, right? Banning a substance that could give an unfair advantage, just in case it does, is a possibility. And i guess it could be explained away in that manner...it's being banned just as a precaution, as an overreation, and to protect athletes from the disturbing side effects. But just on the logical side of it, as josebach said, why would athletes take the stuff if it wasn't helpful? They'd eventually just quit taking it, right? And why would it have to be banned if it was helpful? Wouldn't MLB/Olympics be better served just ignoring something that didn't provide an unfair competitive advantage?
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Postby j_d_mcnugent » Mon May 07, 2007 10:02 am

i seem to recall this topic coming up in a different thread. it is acknowledged that HGH can help you recover faster. recovery time is important for the performance of pitchers. faster recovery will help players hit the weight room harder. it will help players recover from injuries faster. wouldn't those be performance enhancing benefits?

hgh allows you to develop lean muscle...basically it allows you to be thinner but just as strong. not so important for baseball but hypothetically a thinner athlete that is just as strong will be quicker and more agile...this would benefit runners, certain football positions, wrestlers, boxers, gymnasts, etc.

if you read all these studies that are being referred to they involve geriatrics with low levels of GH. there really arent any studies of people with normal levels of GH taking GH supplements. its hard to say exactly how much or how little it effects the performance of athletes.

ballplayers and other athletes are taking just HGH. they are taking HGH in conjunction with insulin, testosterone, EPO and who knows what else. there are no controlled tests to study those effects.


On the other hand, i think the fact that MLB and the Olympics ban HGH does have some bearing on the discussion of whether or not this is a substance that can improve athletic performance. I mean, why would they ban it if it couldn't be used to unfairly gain an athletic advantage? I'm sure part of it is being precautionary, right? Banning a substance that could give an unfair advantage, just in case it does, is a possibility. And i guess it could be explained away in that manner...it's being banned just as a precaution, as an overreation, and to protect athletes from the disturbing side effects.


that is correct...it is being banned because if it works as advertised it would be illegal. the same thing was true of andro. they banned it because if it actually did what it claimed to do it would be illegal. after a few years they found out andro didnt do anything. it costs a lot of money to do those scientific tests not to mention the ethical and legal issues of administering human testing. there is limited human research on hgh....there are some studies on elderly people or children with low levels of GH. its a huge risk to give a healthy person GH so there shouldnt be any scientific studies done in that manner.
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