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"Mom, they said I have to work my way up"

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"Mom, they said I have to work my way up"

Postby TheRock » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:01 pm

Wow, so apparently companies are now having to deal with 'helicopter parents' who want to be so involved in their kids' lives, they actually try to manage their entire career for them. 8-o

USAToday wrote:Employers are finding that parents are increasingly involved in their children's job choices, as "helicopter parenting" extends to the workplace.

As Generation Y enters the job force, parents of new hires are calling employers to negotiate salary and benefits, and some are even showing up at job fairs. It's a new dynamic that has some employers responding by training recruiters and managers how to handle "helicopter parents," who hover over their children's lives.

•At Hewlett-Packard, parents have gone as far as contacting the company after their child gets a job offer. They want to talk about their son's or daughter's salary, relocation packages and scholarship programs.

"Parents are contacting us directly," says Betty Smith, a university recruiting manager at HP. "This generation is not embarrassed by it. They're asking for parents' involvement."

She recalls one job fair in Texas "where the parent was there at our booth asking about benefits." The company has trained recruiters in how to handle parents.

•At Weber Shandwick, a global public relations firm, a father recently called the company to inquire about how his son could apply for its Atlanta internship program.

"I was very surprised. I answered my phone, and he said he had a son interested in internships," says Jennifer Seymour, who runs the intern program at the Atlanta office, where two full-time internships are offered every summer. They largely go to recent college graduates. She says helicopter parents create a negative view among hiring managers. "It hurts. Absolutely."

•At insurance provider Chubb, employees have helped their children get jobs at the company. Mary Troianello, 56, a senior administrative assistant, who has worked in human resources and other jobs for Chubb for about 16 years, helped her daughter Leah, 25, tweak her résumé, submitted it to the human resources department and helped her pick an interview suit and prepare for the interview. Leah got the job in accounts payable.

"I didn't feel the colleges were doing enough in that area," Mary says. "The (graduates) really don't have a clue. They're lost."

But too much parental involvement can backfire: Employers may shy away from job candidates because they don't want to deal with parents.

"Psychologically, it's somewhat eroding. When an employer is hiring someone, they're hiring an adult for an adult job, and then they have to deal with a parent," says Charles Wardell in New York, the managing director and head of the northeast region at Korn/Ferry. "There comes a time when you've prepared children, and you need to let go."

link

I can't believe we've succeeded in raising a sufficiently helpless generation for this to happen. Wait.... yes I can. All I know is if anyone ever interviews with me for a job, then I get a call from their parents, or they bring mommy to the interview, no way in heck are they getting a job doing anything. You want to be a good parent? Let your kid grow up!!
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Postby teddy ballgame » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:03 pm

That's really not good. How are people supposed to grow up and learn how to stand up for themselves and get a job with a parent who does that? Oh, they can't. :-t
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Postby knapplc » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:05 pm

I hear about this all the time - Mom or Dad doesn't like this or that so they go to their adult child's workplace and raise hell. In my line of work it's usually a bad scene, but sometimes I have parents who think they're actually helping.

And I agree - if I was hiring and someone's mom or dad called me after an interview, that resume would go straight into the recycle bin. :-t
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Postby Pablo975 » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:15 pm

You'll love this then:

I once had an employee quit our staff 2 days before Christmas. She was scheduled to work on Christmas Day from 10am til 2pm. This was in a radio station, where everyone accepts that holidays and weekends are part of the job. Being a younger, part time DJ ensures you'll work those shifts. This girl had been in radio for 3-4 years AT LEAST so she knew the rules. She decided that she was above working then and quit with 2 days notice. Now, I don't begrude her not wanting to work a holiday, but she knew WEEKS in advance that she was scheduled for it and quit 2 days before. I had to scramble to find someone to cover it, ruin their holiday, and I even ended up covering part of it.

The following Monday, she shows up in the middle of our morning show (a HUGE radio no-no) wanting to turn in her key. She also wanted to talk about a reference and wanted her check.....at 7am. The office staff didn't arrive until 9am. I told her she'd get her check in two weeks like everyone else, said nothing about a reference, took her key and reminded her where the back door was. I followed her to the back door and ensured it closed tightly behind her. Some nerve from this girl right? It gets better!

The next day, her GRANDFATHER calls my office to yell at me for "treating her so badly" and that his company would stop spending money with the station, etc, etc. (Yeah, cause dock workers at a local warehouse for a massive potato chip company have that kinda pull...) He even threatened to "come up there and straighten you out".

I laughed so hard at him I didn't hear the rest or explain to him what a selfish B his granddaughter was.

I mean, YOUR GRANDPA!?!?!?
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Postby Madison » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:05 pm

Probably not a shock to anyone, but I agree. If someone cannot do it themselves and needs mommy or daddy to stick their nose in, they don't get any job I may be hiring in for because if they cannot run their own lives, how are they going to run anything else? :-/
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Postby Art Vandelay » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:18 pm

Yeah, if anyone ever applied for a job with me and I got a call or visit from their parents I would immediately take them out of consideration.

Once when I was managing a bookstore, a kid I had hired showed up 10 minutes late for his first day of work. I told him not to bother clocking in, or ever coming back, that I wasn't going to hire him. A few hours later his dad stopped by. I figured I was going to have to listen to him try to convince me to give his son another chance or whatever, but he just thanked me, said hopefully that was what his kid needed, and left. Good guy, him.
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Postby RugbyD » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:19 pm

Parents coaching behind the scenes as a teaching tool is great, but by gosh if I ever get a call from one down the road I will refuse to talk to them. If a kid is OK with his parents making direct communication, they are clearly not worth hiring.
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Postby Pablo975 » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:25 pm

Agreed. My parents gave me all sorts of useful advice about the job world as a teen. If I'd listened, I'd be more successful than I am now! But they NEVER contacted my bosses.....heck, they rarely if ever SAW the places I worked.

But my God....who could actually look their coworkers or boss in the face if the parents did that? They must have ZERO self respect.
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Postby Old_Style » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:32 pm

Pablo975 wrote:Agreed. My parents gave me all sorts of useful advice about the job world as a teen. If I'd listened, I'd be more successful than I am now! But they NEVER contacted my bosses.....heck, they rarely if ever SAW the places I worked.

But my God....who could actually look their coworkers or boss in the face if the parents did that? They must have ZERO self respect.


That about sums up my thoughts.
Parents giving their kid advice on what questions they should be finding answers to and other sorts of advice like that is great. Actually showing up to an interview or arguing with their former boss is just ridiculous.
I've actually never heard of a parent doing something like this, but it doesn't surprise me. It's pretty bad when kids my age don't have the motivation or desire to do things on their own. :-t
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Postby The Artful Dodger » Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:08 am

Hmmm...as if parents living vicariously through their children's academic careers, striving to push them to an Ivy League education wasn't enough. :-b

If I could be serious for a minute, I'd be ashamed of myself if anyone, let alone my parents, had to play a significant role in me earning the job, to the point I didn't earn it at all. My mom is good friends with the president and CEO of a garment company downtown (he was her ex-boss) and she was willing to ask him if he could help land me a job within the company. I hated the idea and being the polar opposite of the risk-averse archetype, I had this "Internet startup or go bust" philosophy. It was difficult being turned down by every tech company I can imagine, but eventually I found the startup path and there's nothing more satisfying than climbing the mountain toward this goal. I sort of had gone against my parents' career advice/recommendations, but they seem content with where I'm headed.

I've actually known friends from college who fit in this type, but they more or less fit in the rich kid slacker mold, and not so much the helpless spoiled brat type.
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