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Mark Prior signs 1-year deal with the DL

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Postby Another Blown Save » Wed Apr 25, 2007 3:57 pm

To update...

Rotoworld wrote:Dr. James Andrews performed a debridement of Mark Prior’s right rotator cuff as well as repair of labral and capsular injuries in his right shoulder during seas-ending surgery Tuesday.
That's all the detail the Cubs provided. If the labrum was torn, Prior is going to have a lot to overcome in his rebab over the next year. He was essentially done for 2007 no matter what the surgery turned up, and what was discovered seems to be significant enough to put his status for the beginning of 2008 in doubt. Perhaps the best-case scenario would have him back at 100 percent in 2009. However, there's a real chance he never returns as an effective major league pitcher.


Sounds like he's really done this time :,-(
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Postby knapplc » Wed Apr 25, 2007 4:03 pm

Another Blown Save wrote:To update...

Rotoworld wrote:Dr. James Andrews performed a debridement of Mark Prior’s right rotator cuff as well as repair of labral and capsular injuries in his right shoulder during seas-ending surgery Tuesday.
That's all the detail the Cubs provided. If the labrum was torn, Prior is going to have a lot to overcome in his rebab over the next year. He was essentially done for 2007 no matter what the surgery turned up, and what was discovered seems to be significant enough to put his status for the beginning of 2008 in doubt. Perhaps the best-case scenario would have him back at 100 percent in 2009. However, there's a real chance he never returns as an effective major league pitcher.


Sounds like he's really done this time :,-(


That is just so sad. :-/
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Postby Rounders » Wed Apr 25, 2007 4:06 pm

It hurts my heart :~(
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Postby thedude » Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:27 am

Dinkin flicka. :,-(
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Postby RAmst23 » Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:45 am

Ouch Prior :,-( .. I'm a Cardinals' fan, and you still don't want to see an opposing teams player to go through that much. This might just be career finishing, that's alot to recover from...
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Postby shasty mcnasty » Thu Apr 26, 2007 3:20 pm

From Paul Sullivan, Chicago Tribune:

The news that Mark Prior is out for 2007 after arthroscopic shoulder surgery leads many to believe he is baseball's most overpaid player, earning $3.575 million this year without throwing a pitch in the majors.

But while Prior certainly has not earned his salary the last couple of years, his sensational '03 season and the great expectations arising from it helped the Cubs make tons of money, despite his unproductive years on the field in '05 and '06.

Prior might have been a critical flop by the end of his Cubs run, but he certainly was a financial boon to an organization that thrives on star power. Few Cubs ever have sold as many jerseys as Prior, and few Cubs have been as popular as Prior was at the height of his success.

He might never pitch again for the Cubs, and that's a shame. But if that's the case, few close observers will shed many tears. His churlish attitude toward the media, his obvious disdain for Cubs management and his often condescending demeanor made it hard to sympathize with him.

No matter what happens, however, Prior will always have 2003, a magical year that ended in disaster but provided Chicago with more thrills than a lifetime pass to the old Riverview.

After being hyped out of Southern California as the next Tom Seaver, Prior rose to the majors meteorically and dominated from the get-go.

After only nine minor-league starts, Prior struck out 10 while beating Pittsburgh in his major-league debut May 22, 2002. He had three double-digit-strikeout outings in his first five starts, which only Fernando Valenzuela has done.

But that was just the beginning. By '03, he was well on his way to becoming one of the top right-handers in baseball. After being injured in July in a basepath collision with then-Braves second baseman Marcus Giles, Prior came back to win National League Pitcher of the Month Awards in August and September. He went 10-1 with a 1.52 ERA in 11 starts after his comeback, leading the Cubs to the division title.

"It was unbelievable," said Milwaukee's Damian Miller, who caught Prior in '03 after catching Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling in Arizona. "When it was his turn to pitch, it was over with.

"I've caught some pretty good pitchers in my career, but that stretch he had was just as impressive as any of those guys. He won 18 games and had a [2.43] ERA. We pretty much jumped on him and [Kerry Wood], and they carried us.

"It was a fun time for me and the fans around here. I'm sure he'd like to get back to where he was then."

The first indication Prior was a candidate for the Disabled List Hall of Fame came the next spring, when elbow problems surfaced and created a soap opera . But he came back strong in the stretch and went 2-0 with a 2.17 ERA in five September starts, including a 16-strikeout performance against Cincinnati in a heartbreaking 12-inning loss Sept. 30.

After that, it was all downhill, culminating in Wednesday's announcement that he's out for the season. For those who remember Prior at his peak, the news was distressing.

"It has to be tough for him, just because of what he's capable of doing, just in terms of being snakebitten with injuries," Miller said.

"But he has to look on the bright side. He's only 26, so you surrender a year, come back when you're 27, and he still has a lot of years to pitch. Hopefully he can prove to people he is the pitcher everyone thought he was going to be."

If he does, it will likely be in a different place, wearing a different uniform and with tempered expectations.

All you can do is wish Prior luck in his next destination and hope he doesn't make the same mistakes he did here.

http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubs/cs-070425sullyoncubs,1,7292065.story?coll=cs-cubs-headlines
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Postby shasty mcnasty » Thu Apr 26, 2007 3:35 pm

Another Blown Save wrote:To update...

Rotoworld wrote:Dr. James Andrews performed a debridement of Mark Prior’s right rotator cuff as well as repair of labral and capsular injuries in his right shoulder during seas-ending surgery Tuesday.
That's all the detail the Cubs provided. If the labrum was torn, Prior is going to have a lot to overcome in his rebab over the next year. He was essentially done for 2007 no matter what the surgery turned up, and what was discovered seems to be significant enough to put his status for the beginning of 2008 in doubt. Perhaps the best-case scenario would have him back at 100 percent in 2009. However, there's a real chance he never returns as an effective major league pitcher.

Sounds like he's really done this time :,-(


ya' know what's weird about this? there's no actual information as to what, if any injury there was. i mean, what's a debridement? I'm certainly no expert, but this stuff that's described in the 1st paragraph really doesn't sounds like any repair of a specific major injury. i mean, wouldn't pretty much any pitcher's should need to be cleaned up, if a surgeon actually went into it? It's not a natural thing they're doing with their arms...i'm sure most pitchers' shoulders could be cleaned up here and there, and if they were cleaned up, they would probably be done until the next year. Maybe i'm crazy, but i guess i was expecting something a bit more specific and/or serious to be found. I wonder if this really will mean and end to his career... :-?
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Postby shasty mcnasty » Thu Apr 26, 2007 5:18 pm

From Will Carroll, of Baseball Prospectus (link to SI article)
[urlhttp://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/baseball/mlb/04/26/under.theknife/index.html [/url]
I spent most of Wednesday waiting and wondering, like most baseball fans. It was the day we'd all finally have some closure on Mark Prior. Was he pitching through a damaged shoulder? Was the damage related to mechanics (a SLAP lesion or torn cuff) or was it more related to overuse? Did Dr. James Andrews put his scope in and see more pitches left in the once-magic shoulder of Prior? I spent a lot of time on the phone and pouring through medical books and journals to make sure I had a grasp on all the possibilities. I find this outcome unsatisfying and can only imagine how Prior feels about now. By the time you read this, Prior will alread have begun his rehab, a long road that's aimed at taking the mound again, hopefully without the pain that's plagued him since 2003. (Yes, you read that sentence correctly.) Prior is an object lesson in the shoulder's fragility, in the fact that the sure thing isn't, not unless we do more.

I wondered aloud to one source yesterday about how much money was spent on Prior's lost time and medical bills, money that could have been invested in research into the prevention of pitching injuries. For an industry that lost over $212 million dollars to pitchers on the DL last season, the paltry few million they've earmarked for research is simply not enough. It's not just Prior that would benefit, but maybe the next Mark Prior. He's the one out on a Little League field, hearing parents and coaches complain about the new pitch count regulations. I actually had someone say to me yesterday that the regulations were ruining baseball. In contrast, I think the ruination of countless young arms on neighborhood diamonds is plenty of reason to, if necessary, nuke the game at that level. It's one thing to risk injury to a professional player in the heat of a pennant race, and quite another to do so in quest of a 12-year-old's trophy. We've got a long way to go and a lot left to learn.

Powered by Chelsea's 1-0 victory over Liverpool, on to the injuries:

• Prior's surgery went about as was expected. Dr. Andrews got his scope inside, looked around, and saw a lot of damage. My initial impressions were pretty much dead on with what sources have told me. It's telling that he'll start his rehab in Birmingham, as it appears that he's headed out of Chicago. Will a change of scenery and a new medical staff help Prior? That is as unclear as everything else in Prior's universe. At 27, he remains relatively young, and if he comes out of this surgery pain-free, he has a chance to do what Chris Carpenter did at age 28 after a similar surgical repair. That Prior had significant damage inside the shoulder tells us that the last couple seasons could have been different, years that were essentially lost to Prior and to the Cubs. Going forward, putting Prior with a pitching coach like Dave Duncan or Jim Hickey would make for an interesting mix.

• Most of the damage indicates a slow wearing rather than any significant trauma, which puts the blame more on Dusty Baker than anyone else, especially Marcus Giles. I've seen some blindly suggesting that the Bankart lesion was the result of that 2003 collision but if that had been the case, the amount of damage occurring to the ligaments would be sufficiently significant to cause instability that would prevent return to activity for an extended period of time -- extended here meaning far more than the three starts he missed. The reported outcome after the collision was a Grade II acromioclavicular sprain. Since the AC sprain involved the acromioclavicular ligament (which basically ties the clavicle and scapula together), there would be very little likelihood that this injury could have involved his labrum. With Prior, there does not appear to be any history of significant injury to the glenohumeral joint itself, therefore making this a wear and tear injury that could have been exacerbated by the fact that the may have been genetically bilaterally lax as compared to the "norm." We also have to remember that the shoulder laxity found during 2006 was said to be muscular, not structural. The once-vaunted mechanics fell apart when pain pulled down on his arm slot, leaving him "throwing pies" as one pitching coach described it.


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