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No Child Left Behind

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No Child Left Behind

Postby BGbootha » Wed Feb 14, 2007 4:37 pm

Someone posted about NCLB in another thread so I thought I would share this.

No Child Left Behind - Football Version



The football version of what is going on in education right now. (If you're not an educator, this may not make a lot of sense to you. Send it to your friends who are in education, they will love it!


1. All teams must make the state playoffs and all MUST win the championship. If a team does not win the championship, they will be on probation until they are the champions, and coaches will be held accountable. If after two years they have not won the championship their footballs and equipment will be taken away UNTIL they do win the

championship.



2. All kids will be expected to have the same football skills at the same time even if they do not have the same conditions or opportunities to practice on their own. NO exceptions will be made for lack of interest in football, a desire to perform athletically, or genetic abilities or

disabilities of themselves or their parents.



ALL KIDS WILL PLAY FOOTBALL AT A PROFICIENT LEVEL!


3. Talented players will be asked to work out on their own, without instruction. This is because the coaches will be using all their instructional time with the athletes who aren't interested in football, have limited athletic ability or whose parent's don't like football.



4. Games will be played year round, but statistics will only be kept in the 4th, 8th, and 11th game.


This will create a New Age of Sports where every school is expected to have the same level of talent and all teams will reach the same minimum goals. If no child gets ahead, then no child gets left behind. If parents do not like the new law, they are encouraged to vote for vouchers and support private schools that can screen out the non-athletes and prevent their children from having to go to school with bad football players.

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Postby bigh0rt » Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:13 pm

In a nutshell.
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Postby chadlincoln » Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:18 pm

My wife who was a teacher hated this program.
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Postby Madison » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:17 pm

The biggest problem with the program is that some kids are just flat dumb. Some kids will fail. Simple as that, but the state doesn't want the public to see a high percentage of kids failing. Less people move into the state, more move away, it hurts the economy, makes the state look bad, makes the school system look bad, etc, and that's what the state is looking at.

Instead, they should be happy when a kid fails. That's one less idiot with a diploma, and one less idiot "free" upon the world.

I actually saw this the other day......true story.....kids had 30 minutes to do a 100 problem math paper. One student didn't finish in time and only answered 58 questions. He got them all correct, so that gave him a grade of 58. The teacher told him not to worry about it because she was going to give him a "class participation grade" of 82, which would balance that 50 out to a 70. WHAT? 8-o

So an idiot kid has now passed because the state is worried about how it looks to the other states when the percentage of kids failing is too high? 8-o

Terrible....simply terrible.

Swallow your pride schools, and actually start failing those idiot kids rather than trying to make yourselves look better! It's not helping anyone to keep giving diplomas away like they are toilet paper. It doesn't help to threaten schools, threaten teachers, refuse funding, etc, in order to falsely boost the passing numbers (yes, I'm looking at you Federal Government!). :-t
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Postby bigh0rt » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:50 pm

There is immense pressure to pass kids in this day and age, it's unbelievable. The NCLB Act has become, by and far, the main issue of debate among American schools, and not in a good way. I've yet to run into a single educator who has a single good thing to say about the changes that have been made, and from a first-hand experience, I know the pressures it's throwing on teachers, students, and districts. And it's not the type of pressure that you put on someone to push them to succeed, either. It's the type that leaves many teachers weighing teaching to the test versus following alternative methods that may lead to the children actually learning and becoming thinkers. But, when the pressure of tenure vs. no tenure, or being squeezed out vs. feeling secure with your job are on the line, believe me, the decision is a much more difficult one than one would hope it to be. A new national direction is seriously in need, and I can only hope that we're able to start weighing our nations' children against one another in some other way as soon as humanly possible. :-/
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Postby Coppermine » Wed Feb 14, 2007 7:02 pm

I actually agree with Madison here completely. Looking at education realistically, there are some kids that have to be left behind. Kids that can't keep up, kids that can't focus or comprehend the essential skills to be contributing members of society. There is no possible way, as large as this country is, for every kid in ever school to never be left behind.

And this is why no child left behind is a joke; when you take a "no child left behind approach" the kids who can't keep up get extra help while the kids who can actually make a difference get less attention than they deserve. Students should be broken up into skill levels; there should be an emphasis on college prep in school, along with a general tract and a vocation tract. Children shouldn't be "left behind" per-se, but some children just aren't going to reach the potential of their peers and they should prepared for what they are going to face rather than be treated as some sort of "you're all winners" equal. And if parents don't like it... WORK WITH YOUR KIDS! I blame parents just as much, if children shouldn't be left behind then parents should pick up the burden of pushing their kids ahead. I understand the disadvantages that go with race and economic status, but things need to start evening out on their own rather than this governmental push for equality when it comes to education.

If want to stop being ranked, what, like 44th in the world when it comes to our children's intelligence, then it has to start with the family.
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Postby TheRock » Wed Feb 14, 2007 7:58 pm

Bootha, I feel your pain man.

Ok, not literally, I'm not a teacher but boy would I ever not want to be one. The whole thing's a mess and I don't think anyone has any idea how to fix it, nor does there seem to be any consensus on what "fix" would mean. The problem as I see is that we are a society who raises stupid kids. There are exceptions, sure, but our kids see themselves as having more important things to do than learn. There are plenty of things we could blame here; parents, TV, Playstation, rap music, whatever. Problem #2 is parents no longer see themselves as having a role in educating their child. That's the government's job. So teachers are stuck in the middle. They get dealt increasingly stupid kids with increasing absent parents, and when the kids don't learn everyone blames the teacher.

I'm not sure you could pay me enough money to do that job, but thing is, it's not much money we're talking about here. Everyone talks about getting better teachers in the classroom, but how? There are already educational requirements in place (when I checked, it would take me another full 2 years of school to get a certificate, just to make quite a bit less than I had been making). I mean, how are we going to attract more qualified individuals to the field if we keep requiring more of them, paying them less than they could earn in private industry, heaping silly requirements on them, and completely dis-empowering them in the classroom?

Sadly, I think NCLB or something like it will always be with us. "Leave the stupid kids behind" just doesn't fit the general socialist tilt of government provided services. That means teachers' jobs will largely consist of preparing students to take standardized tests. My own prediction is we will see a mass exodus from public schools, both students and teachers. And that might not be a bad thing.
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Postby Absolutely Adequate » Wed Feb 14, 2007 8:13 pm

I hate the NCLB act more each day. In a nutshell, here's how it affects my life:

1. I have to go to 9 (nine!) hours of meetings per week outside of school. I am not paid extra for this.

2. The meetings are strictly about how to prepare kids for the HSA - a NCLB test for 10th graders. This quarter, I have been told that I have to have the kids do 3 weeks worth of research in the library. They don't have to write a paper, though, just a thesis statement. Apparently, writing essays isn't on the mandated test so I can't teach it. I was told about 3 weeks ago that "we don't have time to teach the kids to do anything but pass this test."

3. The kids have to learn to write short essays called "ECRs" and BCRs." They will never see these things again after they take the test. I am to spend a year, however, teaching them nothing but these ridiculous metrics. Also, many of the things that the NCLB act is looking for on these metrics is exactly the opposite of what you'd want the kids to do on a real essay.

4. Every day, 5-10 minutes before I start teaching, the head of the department comes around and gives me a lesson plan for the day. It tells me exactly what I'm supposed to do with every minute of my day. The kids are supposed to spend 5 minutes on activity A, for instance, and I will get in trouble if I spend 10.


Confession: At risk of losing my job, I don't do any of the things they tell me to do. My kids write essays and read books andd it's just like a real classroom: the kind you saw before the monstrous NCLB act was passed.
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Postby SHOCKandAWE » Wed Feb 14, 2007 8:20 pm

I still say the two biggest problems with kids doing bad in school these day are"

#1 Parents

#2 Video Games

School is like work. It is called work for a reason. If you do not try and do well you will not do well.

Most of the time when kids do poor in school it is because they suck at being students.
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Postby speedy27 » Wed Feb 14, 2007 11:39 pm

SHOCKandAWE wrote:I still say the two biggest problems with kids doing bad in school these day are"

#1 Parents

#2 Video Games

School is like work. It is called work for a reason. If you do not try and do well you will not do well.

Most of the time when kids do poor in school it is because they suck at being students.



agreed...but i'd put Lack of proper Discipline towards students is another reason they act as they do. If we could just bring back the 'ol board and bust some butt, most will straighten up!!
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