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Re: Book of the Month Club

Postby josebach » Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:33 pm

J35J wrote:
J35J wrote:.... and give at least a little description about the book and what makes it great in your eyes.



Lets get some descriptions on some of these books and tell us what makes them so great......


Wizard's First Rule was the first fantasy book I read that was truly written for adults. These are NOT children's books. With as awesome as the character development, action and romance is (yes, romance), it's actually the philosophy behind the books that make me like them so much. Logic and reason is used by the main character "Richard" for every decision he makes. These books are about morality, but not morality through a religious perspective, but morality through what reason tells us is fair and true. That's why the series is called "Sword of Truth".

I can admit that these books aren't for everyone. First of all, these books are very violent and have a lot of adult themes that some people might find distrubing. There are also a few fantasy cliches in them that some might find unoriginal such as the humble farmer (woods guide) being destined for greatness. On the other hand, everything about the books is so well done and the story is so intricately woven, that the sheer quality of the book makes up for any fantasy themes we may have seen before. Many people including myself feel they're the best fantasy books they've ever read.

The Sword of Truth series is eleven books long, but the first couple books are very much stand alone stories, so by no means should you feel like if you read "Wizard's First Rule" that you will be obligated to read all eleven. If you're a fan of fantasy at all, you owe it to yourself to at least read the first book in the series.
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Re: Book of the Month Club

Postby CheeseBeger » Sat Jan 27, 2007 12:13 am

josebach wrote:
Wizard's First Rule



I read most of these books while I was in high school when I was in my scifi/fantasy stage. They were pretty good, but as I read more and more fantasy I realized most of them have the same themes, and were done to a certain formula. Sword of Truth was definately the best series that I read.


The book I would suggest to everyone is:

Shogun
by James Clavell

Shogun is Clavells masterpiece. It is a historical fiction about a English sailor named Blackthorne who is shipwrecked in 16th century Japan, just when the European nations were exploring the Orient. Blackthorne has to deal with the entirely foreign culture of feudal Japan.

This book is truely great because it examines the complex power struggles of Japan coming to grips with Western Influence, and the huge cultural differences between the East and West. It is a long epic, but when you finish you will still want more, and everyone I know that has read this book now has it in their top 5.
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Re: Book of the Month Club

Postby AcidRock23 » Sat Jan 27, 2007 12:31 am

CheeseBeger wrote:
Shogun
by James Clavell

Shogun is Clavells masterpiece. It is a historical fiction about a English sailor named Blackthorne who is shipwrecked in 16th century Japan, just when the European nations were exploring the Orient. Blackthorne has to deal with the entirely foreign culture of feudal Japan.


That is a really amazing story. I read it in high school, around the time that the TV miniseries was on and it's pretty entertaining. ;-D
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Postby Fireball Express » Sat Jan 27, 2007 12:41 am

"Wild Fire" by Nelson DeMille.
DeMille is one of my favorite novelists. I've enjoyed everything I read by him.
This book's main character/hero, Detective John Corey works for the Federal Anti-Terrorist task Force. He along with his partner/wife, an FBI agent, uncover a plot where a secret society of powerful American elites plan to start WW III by detonating suitcase nukes in American cities.
Corey might be one of my favorite print characters. The Alpha male of all Alpha males is quick witted, sarcastic, and vengeful
Very hard to put this book down come bedtime. As with most of DeMille's works, I didn't want it to end.


"Double Whammy" by Carl Hiaasen.
What DeMille is to NY and Long Island, Hiaasen is to Florida..
This book revolves around the world of Pro Bass Fishing. Since Bass Fishing is one of my favorite past times I was drawn towards this theme. In the book an ex-reporter turned PI, RJ "Rage" Decker, encounters an interesting cast of character that include a millionare, a Tele Evangelist, his ex-wife, a Hermit, a slut and of course Red Necks. At first Rage id hired to catch the Bass Champ cheating in fishing tourmanents. When the Champ turns up dead Decker finds himself trying to solve he murder. When he discovers too much he finds himself running from the man who hired him and the law.
The book takes all sorts of twists and sharp turns. Hiaasen ties it all up in a neat bow at the end.

At the moment I started two other books. Being a new transplant down here in Florida I decided to pick up another novel by Hiaasen, "Skinny Dip".
I also just started "The Year of the Rat - How Bll Clinton and Al Gore Compromised the US Security for Chinese Cash" by Edward Tipmerlake and William C. Triplett II.
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Postby da1chipo » Sat Jan 27, 2007 1:32 am

Fireball Express wrote:"Wild Fire" by Nelson DeMille.
DeMille is one of my favorite novelists. I've enjoyed everything I read by him.
This book's main character/hero, Detective John Corey works for the Federal Anti-Terrorist task Force. He along with his partner/wife, an FBI agent, uncover a plot where a secret society of powerful American elites plan to start WW III by detonating suitcase nukes in American cities.
Corey might be one of my favorite print characters. The Alpha male of all Alpha males is quick witted, sarcastic, and vengeful
Very hard to put this book down come bedtime. As with most of DeMille's works, I didn't want it to end.


I just read that, but I didn't think it was that good. I like most of his books, and Corey is one of my favorite characters in books. Try reading Night Fall, which is the second John Corey book. I think that's probably my favorite DeMille book.
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Postby Fireball Express » Sat Jan 27, 2007 1:16 pm

da1chipo wrote:
Fireball Express wrote:"Wild Fire" by Nelson DeMille.
DeMille is one of my favorite novelists. I've enjoyed everything I read by him.
This book's main character/hero, Detective John Corey works for the Federal Anti-Terrorist task Force. He along with his partner/wife, an FBI agent, uncover a plot where a secret society of powerful American elites plan to start WW III by detonating suitcase nukes in American cities.
Corey might be one of my favorite print characters. The Alpha male of all Alpha males is quick witted, sarcastic, and vengeful
Very hard to put this book down come bedtime. As with most of DeMille's works, I didn't want it to end.


I just read that, but I didn't think it was that good. I like most of his books, and Corey is one of my favorite characters in books. Try reading Night Fall, which is the second John Corey book. I think that's probably my favorite DeMille book.


I enjoyed "Night Fall" as well. I've always been intrigued with anything related to TWA Flight 800.
"Plum Island", the first book that Corey appears in, is great as well.
I've read most of DeMille's works. I'd have to say that "The Gold Coast" was my favorite even though Corey is not in it. That was the first one I read by him.
Anyhow, "Wild Fire" is worth a read. Corey's preoccupation/fear of bears throughout the story and his quick wit involving the subject provided great comic relief in an otherwise very serious plot.
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Postby Pokeyouindaeye » Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:05 am

Complications - Atul Gawande

Memoirs of a surgical resident. If you are interested in medicine, this book is worth a read. Gawande combines crisp writing with an interesting subject to leave an imprint on the reader.
Yes, I was, uh... I was thinking about ordering the tape, the videotape... about the college girls and the... the wild... the wildness. They're going wild or something? Somebody told me... about going wild.
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Postby Absolutely Adequate » Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:13 am

The White Boy Shuffle by Paul Beatty:

Gunnar Kaufman is an awkward, black surfer bum who is moved by his mom from Santa Monica to urban West Los Angeles. There, he begins to undergo a startling transformation from neighborhood outcast to basketball superstar and eventually to reluctant messiah of a downtrodden people.
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Postby laxguy8947 » Sun Jan 28, 2007 9:09 pm

josebach wrote:


Wizard's First Rule



I read most of these books while I was in high school when I was in my scifi/fantasy stage. They were pretty good, but as I read more and more fantasy I realized most of them have the same themes, and were done to a certain formula. Sword of Truth was definately the best series that I read.


The book I would suggest to everyone is:

Shogun
by James Clavell

Shogun is Clavells masterpiece. It is a historical fiction about a English sailor named Blackthorne who is shipwrecked in 16th century Japan, just when the European nations were exploring the Orient. Blackthorne has to deal with the entirely foreign culture of feudal Japan.

This book is truely great because it examines the complex power struggles of Japan coming to grips with Western Influence, and the huge cultural differences between the East and West. It is a long epic, but when you finish you will still want more, and everyone I know that has read this book now has it in their top 5.


This is now next on my list. Historical fiction is probably my favorite genre. The Shaara novels are some of my favorites.
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Postby silentjim » Sun Jan 28, 2007 9:42 pm

Fireball Express wrote:"Double Whammy" by Carl Hiaasen.
What DeMille is to NY and Long Island, Hiaasen is to Florida..
This book revolves around the world of Pro Bass Fishing. Since Bass Fishing is one of my favorite past times I was drawn towards this theme. In the book an ex-reporter turned PI, RJ "Rage" Decker, encounters an interesting cast of character that include a millionare, a Tele Evangelist, his ex-wife, a Hermit, a slut and of course Red Necks. At first Rage id hired to catch the Bass Champ cheating in fishing tourmanents. When the Champ turns up dead Decker finds himself trying to solve he murder. When he discovers too much he finds himself running from the man who hired him and the law.
The book takes all sorts of twists and sharp turns. Hiaasen ties it all up in a neat bow at the end.

At the moment I started two other books. Being a new transplant down here in Florida I decided to pick up another novel by Hiaasen, "Skinny Dip".
I also just started "The Year of the Rat - How Bll Clinton and Al Gore Compromised the US Security for Chinese Cash" by Edward Tipmerlake and William C. Triplett II.


I've read every Carl Hiaasen book and love them all. I just bought the new one, but haven't gotten around to reading it quite yet.
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