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Postby suppasonic » Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:35 pm

Martin Luther, the founder of Prodestanism, has had more impact on religion than anyone since the Bible was written down and compiled. The word "protestant" derives from the protest drawn up by a group of reforming German princes at the Diet of Speyer in 1529. delete "once again" At first , the term “Protestant” referred to the Lutheran religion , but after new ideas and beliefs were discovered it was applied to all non-Catholic Christians. "Discovered" is the wrong word. Beliefs aren't "discovered," they are "integrated into the culture" or "professed", something like that. The Confession of Augsburg, in 1530, was summoned to “officially” formulate Lutheran ideas. Martin Luther’s ideas of justification by faith, authority of the Bible, and idea of the equality of every individual were the basis for his teachings and writings; he believed that faith in God and knowledge of his Words was the most worthy thing a man could posses.

Of the four basic questions that Luther answered, the most important and prolific one was the idea of “justification by faith.” The traditional Catholic belief was that salvation is achieved by both faith and good works. The ambiguity of “good works” led to many interpretations by corrupted clergymen and the papacy. They used specify what "this" is to earn profit for themselves such as by the sale of indulgences. His argument of salvation by faith and faith alone can be found in his the following should be italicized or in quotes, I forget which treatise On Christian Liberty. In it he wrote: “What can it profit to the soul that the body should be in good condition, free, and full of life, that it should eat, drink, and act according to its pleasure, when even the most impious slaves of every kind of vice are prosperous in these matters?” (citation here). Luther felt that no good works would please the soul or God. These beliefs/professions/teachings/etc. greatly opposed centuries of church policies and teachings. There were few popes, cardinals, or bishops who believed that good works did not contribute to/would not help one reach salvation. Of all church teachings and oppositions are poor words to use here. Issues, controversies, or beliefs will work better, or you find a word you like , the most important and debatable issue was the question of salvation not the question of salvation. Everyone in the church agrees there is salvation. You mean "the question of how to achieve salvation." Even in his earlier years Martin Luther only received temporary relief from sins and “God’s demands” from confessions and fasts. Luther believed in only God and faith in God, and that nothing else compensates for faith in Christ.

The issue that was discussed and written about the most was the issue of the superiority of the Bible and Scriptures. Bad Sentence. The question of where the religious authority resided aroused/galvanized the peasents and lead to revolt. The traditional Christian doctrine believed what is "it" belonged both to the Bible and the teaching of the church. Martin Luther believed in the concept of sola scriputura or “scripture alone.” This means that the authority of the church is only valid if the doctrine or issue is in the scriptures. The sale of indulgences directly conflicted with this belief of Luther. He believed the word of God was the greatest thing on earth. In the treatise On Christian Liberty again, italics or quotes, I dont remember which , he wrote, “Having the Word, it is rich and wants for nothing, since that is the Word of life, of truth, of light, of peace, of justification, of salvation, of joy, of liberty, of wisdom, of virtue, of grace, of glory, and of every good thing…” (citation) . This new concept was very radical for his time, because during this period the church had as equal if not more power than The Church is a group. Kings are individual. Say "the arisocracy" instead of kings, or replace the church with "the pope" and leave "the kings". The pope was the most powerful and “respected” man in the known world, and this peasant miner’s son disagreed with his authority! Luther believed that people should read the scriptures for themselves, so he was implying not to trust words of the church. Luther believed in not doing what the church teaches, delete "to you" but to trust the word of God and Christ.

Martin Luther’s next use "teachings that stirred up controversy" and delete the whole "answers to" thing were the meaning of the church and the highest form of church life. Medieval churchmen isnt a word and the rest of the world had defined the church as only the clergy. Luther believed that the church was composed of the entire community of Christian believers. In the Middle Ages it was almost common sense that the church included only the clergymen and nobles; peasants and the middle class were separate from this distinguished class. Luther’s belief of the church being universal undermined the respected church clergy redo this sentence. It doesn't flow. as just being workers for the church and not the church itself. His answer of the age-old question of " what the highest form of church life?" was very popular with the middle-class and peasants. This belief of "the equality of the clergy" allowed Luther to gain tremendous support from the lower classes. Catholic teaching stated that religious and monastic life was superior to secular. He stated, “It will be no profit that the body should be adorned with sacred vestment, or dwell in holy places, or be occupied in sacred offices.” (citation) Luther did not care for any good works or occupations if the people didn’t truly have faith in god. Martin Luther stated in his treatise On Christian Liberty: “And since faith alone justifies, it is evident that by no outward work or labor can the inward man be at all justified, made free, and saved and that no works whatever have any relation to him… Therefore the first care of every Christian ought to be to lay aside all reliance on works, and strength his faith alone more and more, and by if grow in knowledge, not of works, but of Christ Jesus, who has suffered and risen again for him.” make sure this is a block quote, and cite In summary, Martin Luther believed that faith and not a certain occupation allows man to achieve salvation nix the ; and that any man can be saved by living a simple life of faith.

Martin Luther was a man who taught himself well in religion throughout his life. Bad previous sentence. Change it. Do you mean he taught himself in religion or that he wrote a lot about it or that he inspired change or so on and so on. The the sentance is awkward and doesnt follow the rest of your essay. Any fasting or good works didn’t help him achieve spiritual bliss. His ideas of salvation through faith, belief of scriptures alone, and the idea of each individual being equal to God’s eyes work on the parralelism of the previous list demonstrated his hatred not "hatred," but perhaps " strong opposition to" contemporary church beliefs. The sale of indulgences first sparked his revolt; everything he spoke about disagreed with the whole idea. Luther’s works were very popular to many Christians, regardless of class say the time period somewhere in this sentence . The founding father of Protestantism paved the way for other reformers to try and change the church and the corruptions in it.


Sorry, I might have overdone it. The essay is good, but you just need to work on how you phrase your sentences and a couple of grammar errors.
Last edited by suppasonic on Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby citybirds27 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:00 pm

THANK YOU

I'll post here how it finally comes out. ;-D
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Postby citybirds27 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:32 pm

Here it is:

Martin Luther, a Catholic priest and miner’s son, devoted his life to spread his beliefs of the corruptions of the Catholic Church. At first the term “Protestant” referred to the Lutheran religion, but after new ideas and beliefs were developed it was applied to all non-Catholic Christians. The Confession of Augsburg in 1530 was summoned to address the increasing tensions toward the reform of the church. There Luther answered four questions of the church, which were used to officially formula the new Lutheran religion. Martin Luther believed in the concept of justification by faith, supreme authority of the Bible and Scriptures, the equality of each Christian believer in the eyes of God, and that faith in God and His Words were priceless to a Christian man; these beliefs were greatly disputed because they contradicted the century’s old teachings of the powerful church.

Of the four basic questions that Luther answered, the most important and prolific one was the idea of “justification by faith.” The traditional Catholic belief stated that salvation is achieved by both faith and good works. The “good works” led to many interpretations by corrupted clergymen or the papacy to earn profit for themselves, such as the sale of indulgences. His argument of salvation by faith and faith alone can be found in his treatise On Christian Liberty. In it he wrote: “What can it profit to the soul that the body should be in good condition, free, and full of life, that it should eat, drink, and act according to its pleasure, when even the most impious slaves of every kind of vice are prosperous in these matters?” He felt that no good works would please the soul or even God himself. These beliefs greatly opposed centuries of church policies and teachings. There were few popes, cardinals, or bishops who believed that good works did not contribute to salvation. Of all the ambiguous church doctrines, the most important and debatable was the question of achieving salvation. Even in his earlier years, Martin Luther only received temporary relief from sins and “God’s demands” from confessions and fasts. Of all Luther’s famous statements the idea of justification by faith was the basis for his teaching, and was the most debated among his contemporaries.

A major problem of the Catholic Church at the time was the extent of the superiority of the Bible and Scriptures against traditional church teaching. The question was where the religious authority actually resided: the Bible or traditional teachings. Christian doctrine stated it belonged to both the Bible and Catholic teachings. On the contrary, Martin Luther believed in the concept of sola scriputura or “scripture alone.” It meant that the authority of the church was only valid if the doctrine or issue was in the scriptures; once again the sale of indulgences opposed this important aspect of acceptance. He believed the word of God was the greatest thing on earth. In the treatise On Christian Liberty, he wrote, “Having the Word, it is rich and wants for nothing, since that is the Word of life, of truth, of light, of peace, of justification, of salvation, of joy, of liberty, of wisdom, of virtue, of grace, of glory, and of every good thing.” This new concept was very radical for his time, because during the period, the church had as equal if not more power than kings. The pope was the most powerful and “respected” man in the known world, and a peasant miner’s son was disagreeing with his authority! Luther believed that people should read the scriptures for themselves, therefore implying not to trust the “holy” words of the church. His belief was that the pure Words of God himself is what a Christian needs to live a holy life, not the lies of the corrupted church.

The next questions that Martin Luther answered were the meaning of the church and the highest form of church life. Medieval churchmen and almost the rest of the world had defined the church as only the clergy. However, Luther believed that the church was composed of the entire community of Christian believers. In the Middle Ages it was almost common sense that the church included only the clergymen and nobles; peasants and the middle class were separate from this distinguished group. Luther’s belief that the church was universal degraded the respected church clergy as only workers for the church. His answer of the age-old question of what the highest form of church life is became very popular with the middle-class and peasants. The belief that all vocations are equal gained tremendous support from the lower classes. Catholic teaching stated that religious and monastic life was superior to secular. Luther stated, “It will be no profit that the body should be adorned with sacred vestment, or dwell in holy places, or be occupied in sacred offices.” Luther did not care of any good works or occupations if the people didn’t truly have faith in god. Luther stated in the treatise On Christian Liberty: “And since faith alone justifies, it is evident that by no outward work or labor can the inward man be at all justified, made free, and saved and that no works whatever have any relation to him… Therefore the first care of every Christian ought to be to lay aside all reliance on works, and strength his faith alone more and more, and by if grow in knowledge, not of works, but of Christ Jesus, who has suffered and risen again for him.” In summary, Martin Luther believed that faith, not a certain occupation, allows man to achieve salvation; also, any man can be saved by living a life of faith.

Martin Luther was a man who learned multitudes about religion throughout his journeys and teachings. Fasts or good works didn’t help him achieve spiritual bliss. His ideas of salvation through faith, ”sola scriptura”, and the equality of every Christian man demonstrated his strong opposition to contemporary church beliefs. Luther’s works were very popular to many Christians, regardless of class. As the founding father of Protestantism, Luther paved the way for other reformers to try and reform the church and its corruptions.





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Postby AcidRock23 » Sun Oct 15, 2006 1:13 pm

I would question the usage of 'multitudes' in the last paragraph, that is awkward. The AP history teachers I had would have reamed me for that, although that was 15 years ago.

I would also question the first sentence, as I would characterize Luther as being devoted to spreading the word and direct connection with God which he felt was obtainable outside of the Catholic Church. The corruption of the Church was certainly a concern of Luther's but not the main thrust of his research or writings. I would have to suspect that a teacher reviewing this would note that as well.

Rereading the last paragraph a few times, I would suggest reworking it along those lines, I don't think that it's totally correct to characterize Luther as the 'father of Protestantism' as, while he was swept up in what amounted to a political movement of opposition to Catholic authority, I don't recall that in his works he was all that political, more sowing the seeds out of which Protestantism blossomed. I have always kind of put Luther as the theoretician of the Protestant movement which the German princes then used to justify their actions. "Sola Scriptura" doesn't really say anything about politics or leading a revolt, it would be a suggestion to RTFM... ;-D
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Postby citybirds27 » Sun Oct 15, 2006 3:58 pm

thanks for the help acid ;-D
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Postby ukrneal » Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:42 am

Martin Luther, a Catholic priest and miner’s son, devoted his life to spreading his belief that the Catholic Church was corrupted (or 'there was corruption in the Catholic Church').. The term “Protestant” initially referred to the Lutheran religion, but after new ideas and beliefs were developed it was applied to all non-Catholic Christians. The Confession of Augsburg in 1530 was summoned to address the increasing tensions toward the reform of the church. Luther answered four questions of the church, which were used to officially formula the new Lutheran religion. Martin Luther believed in the concept of justification by faith, supreme authority of the Bible and Scriptures, the equality of each Christian believer in the eyes of God, and that faith in God and His Words were priceless to a Christian man; these beliefs were greatly disputed because they contradicted the century’s old teachings of the powerful church

The break from sentence #1 to #2 is problematic. First we're talking about Luther and then we are talking about Protestants. I think the intial version had a better transition here.

A confession cannot summon. Not sure what you are trying to say here. Is this a church term referring to a council? If so, you're ok and I just don't know the subject matter. But I thought it was a document. Is it? I don't like the word 'toward' here. 'surrounding reform of the church' or 'concerning' seem better. Do you mean to formulate? 'To formula' is not correct.

No offense, but I get the feeling you are trying to dress up what you want to say to sound nice. I'd just spit it out. Your first paragraph is a bit confusing. I understand what Luther said, but I don't see what the stuff before it is doing for you in the opening paragraph. Why mention 'miner's son'? Why talk about protestants? I would think this 'Protestants' discussion would go better at the end (as you have it at the end, but stronger and beefed up now).

Example:
Martin Luther was a Catholic priest who devoted his life to speaking out against corruption in the Catholic Church. In 1530 the Confession of Augsburg was developed to explain (or support) his convictions (or 'that supported his convictions'). Martin Luther believed believed in the concept of justification by faith, supreme authority of the Bible and Scriptures, the equality of each Christian believer in the eyes of God, and that faith in God and His Words were priceless to a Christian man; these beliefs were greatly disputed because they contradicted the century’s old teachings of the powerful church.

Anyway, I hope you get what I was driving at. I wouldn't use my example and just paste it into the essay, but it does get to the point faster, which was something I was have trouble understanding.
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Postby BritSox » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:51 am

suppasonic wrote: Martin Luther, the founder of Prodestanism, has had more impact on religion than anyone since the Bible was written down and compiled.


Would quibble. Most impact on Christianity? Probably. But I'd say the Prophet Muhammad had more impact on religion in general.
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Postby AcidRock23 » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:56 am

ukrneal wrote:
Example:
Martin Luther was a Catholic priest who devoted his life to speaking out against corruption in the Catholic Church. In 1530 the Confession of Augsburg was developed to explain (or support) his convictions (or 'that supported his convictions'). Martin Luther believed believed in the concept of justification by faith, supreme authority of the Bible and Scriptures, the equality of each Christian believer in the eyes of God, and that faith in God and His Words were priceless to a Christian man; these beliefs were greatly disputed because they contradicted the century’s old teachings of the powerful church.



Again though, the 'confession' is not really in support of 'speaking out against the Catholic Church'. I think that it is critical to understand that the theological issues came first and that the political issues (including corruption in the Church...) came from the new, humanistic approach to theology.
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Postby ukrneal » Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:06 am

AcidRock23 wrote:
ukrneal wrote:
Example:
Martin Luther was a Catholic priest who devoted his life to speaking out against corruption in the Catholic Church. In 1530 the Confession of Augsburg was developed to explain (or support) his convictions (or 'that supported his convictions'). Martin Luther believed believed in the concept of justification by faith, supreme authority of the Bible and Scriptures, the equality of each Christian believer in the eyes of God, and that faith in God and His Words were priceless to a Christian man; these beliefs were greatly disputed because they contradicted the century’s old teachings of the powerful church.



Again though, the 'confession' is not really in support of 'speaking out against the Catholic Church'. I think that it is critical to understand that the theological issues came first and that the political issues (including corruption in the Church...) came from the new, humanistic approach to theology.


My focus wasn't on content, but on style. I don't remember much about this, but I wasn't really getting it in the first paragraph. What I was trying to do was just put it in a clearer manner. Another way to put it was that the style was inhibiting the understanding of the substance. I was trying to help with the style.
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Postby DevilDriver » Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:31 pm

citybirds27 wrote:Martin Luther, a Catholic priest and miner’s son, devoted his life to spread his beliefs of the corruptions of the Catholic Church. Add something like: These teachings formed the basis of Protestantism. At first the term “Protestant” referred to the Lutheran religion, but after new ideas and beliefs were developed it was applied to all non-Catholic Christians.
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