Andrew Miller thread... - Fantasy Baseball Cafe 2015 Fantasy Baseball Cafe
100% Deposit Bonus for Cafe Members!

Return to Detroit Tigers

Andrew Miller thread...

Moderator: Baseball Moderators

Postby FantasyGURU802 » Thu Aug 24, 2006 3:38 pm

moochman wrote:
Dannomyte wrote:Andrew Miller finally made his pro debut today pitching the bottom of the 6th inning for the Lakeland Tigers. Here's what went down.

Pitcher Change: Andrew Miller replaces Kevin Ardoin.
Brock Peterson strikes out swinging.
Deacon Burns called out on strikes.
Steven Tolleson hit by pitch.
J. R. Taylor grounds out, second baseman Gilberto Mejia to first baseman Jeff Larish.


When will yahoo add him to the wire? :-D


I can't wait, I have the #4 waiver in my league... Hope I can crab him. Said the same thing about Garza, although I had the #5... (Hope he starts)
[b]Member of the SGMKL[/b]
[b]THE FANTASY GURU[/b]
FantasyGURU802
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor


Posts: 610
Joined: 12 Feb 2006
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: On the Mound

Postby mcqfesijiba » Thu Aug 24, 2006 5:59 pm

FantasyGURU802 wrote:
moochman wrote:
Dannomyte wrote:Andrew Miller finally made his pro debut today pitching the bottom of the 6th inning for the Lakeland Tigers. Here's what went down.

Pitcher Change: Andrew Miller replaces Kevin Ardoin.
Brock Peterson strikes out swinging.
Deacon Burns called out on strikes.
Steven Tolleson hit by pitch.
J. R. Taylor grounds out, second baseman Gilberto Mejia to first baseman Jeff Larish.


When will yahoo add him to the wire? :-D


I can't wait, I have the #4 waiver in my league... Hope I can crab him. Said the same thing about Garza, although I had the #5... (Hope he starts)
Haha, they could pull a Craig Hansen of 2005 and not add him. I hope they do add him because I'm targetting him in a dynasty league I'm in. Plus when he comes up in mid-2007, there won't be any waiver wire rush on him. Whoops, I'm sort of kidding on that latter part, but it could happen...
mcqfesijiba
Major League Manager
Major League Manager

User avatar

Posts: 1664
Joined: 31 Dec 2002
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit, MI

Postby Dannomyte » Wed Aug 30, 2006 2:13 pm

Andrew Miller makes young Tiger staff look old

NEW YORK - Soon enough, they’ll be talking about Andrew Miller’s dynamic left arm.

His 98 mph fastball. His 90 mph cutter. His 85 mph breaking ball.

But on Miller’s first day in the big leagues, the Detroit Tigers talked mostly about Miller’s face.

“Little baby face,” manager Jim Leyland said Tuesday. “He looks young. He is young.”

How young? Well, Miller was born in May 1985, seven months after the Tigers’ last World Series appearance and six months after fellow reliever Joel Zumaya, formerly the youngest Tiger.

But Zumaya never looked this young, at least not since he’s been in the big leagues. As the Tigers waited out an all-day rain that eventually caused the postponement of Tuesday night’s game against the Yankees, general manager Dave Dombrowski turned his head in Miller’s direction and asked, “Has he shaved yet?”

“He doesn’t have any grey whiskers, I can tell you that,” Leyland said.

Hardly any whiskers at all, it appears.

The Tigers have a young pitching staff, as it is. Starters Jeremy Bonderman and Justin Verlander are both 23, Zumaya is 21 and Wilfredo Ledezma and Zach Miner are both 25.

Miller has them all beat. He was pitching in the College World Series for North Carolina two months ago, signed his first pro contract not even four weeks ago and has pitched just five professional innings (all scoreless, mind you).

“It’s been quite a ride, a huge roller coaster,” Miller said. “But it just seems to be going higher and higher.”

It could go even higher. Depending on how Miller does in September, and on how the Tigers do, he could do something unprecedented and pitch in the College World Series and the World Series in the same year.

“My concern is to help them get to the post-season,” Miller said.

He could start helping today, as the Tigers and Yankees will be playing a day-night doubleheader in The Bronx. Leyland won’t be afraid to use his newest reliever.

“We’ll warm him up and put him in, if we need him,” Leyland said. “He’s here. He’ll pitch when we determine it’s the right time.”

Leyland’s never afraid to use a pitcher. Remember, he handed Zumaya a one-run seventh-inning lead back on opening day in Kansas City.

He uses anyone, anytime, and his relievers appreciate it.

“Everybody’s fresh,” Jamie Walker said. “Look at our appearances, compared to (the Yankees’) appearances. (Leyland) has run the bullpen excellently. There’s not too many times you get up and don’t get in the game.”

Walker is a 35-year-old veteran, and if not for 38-year-old Todd Jones he’d be the bullpen’s senior citizen. He took it upon himself to help Miller through his first day in the big leagues, just as Jeff Montgomery had helped Walker in 1997 with Kansas City.

“I called him up in his hotel room and introduced myself,” Walker said. “I told him how to handle the media, and I told him to go right after (the hitters). It seems like he’s got a good head on his shoulders. I hope he helps us.”

So far, he’s only helped lower their average age. And given them something to talk about on a rainy night in New York.

http://www.mlive.com/tigers/stories/ind ... thispage=2
Dannomyte
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 959
Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit

Postby Dannomyte » Wed Aug 30, 2006 8:43 pm

Tigers' Miller pitches hitless inning in big league debut

NEW YORK (AP) — Andrew Miller's major league debut was close to flawless, pretty much like his ever-so-brief minor league career.

Detroit's top draft pick pitched a hitless eighth inning as the Tigers lost to the New York Yankees 2-0 in the opener of Wednesday's day-night doubleheader.

"It was a rush. I've got so much adrenaline going, I can't really tell you what I was thinking," Miller said. "My heart is still racing."

Just 21 years old and only three months removed from college ball, the 6-foot-6 left-hander retired Melky Cabrera on a lineout to right, then hit Craig Wilson with a pitch. Johnny Damon hit into a forceout, and Derek Jeter grounded out.

Miller's parents, who live in Gainsville, Fla., were on hand.

"It was pretty cool," he said. "At Yankee Stadium, with all the history and everything. It's such an awesome place."

He was taken with the sixth pick of the draft in June, and helped North Carolina reach the championship round of the College World Series, where the Tar Heels lost to Oregon State.

After signing with the Tigers on Aug. 4, he pitched three times at Class-A Lakeland, striking out nine in five innings with one walk and two hits allowed.

After Damon's forceout, Detroit manager Jim Leyland visited him on the mound.

"I thought he had himself together. When I went out to talk to him, he rattled off the signs right away." Leyland said. "I thought he handled himself well. I sure like what I saw."

Miller's 17-pitch outing against the Yankees impressed Damon.

"He's going to be around for a while," Damon said.

Detroit had Miller get loose in the bullpen in the fifth inning.

"When I warmed up the first time, I was throwing everything with everything I had, and that wasn't working out too well for me," he said. "The next time, I concentrated on slowing everything down, throwing everything at 60 to 70 percent. I don't think I was actually doing that, but mentally that's basically what I was thinking."

http://www.mlive.com/newsflash/michigan ... wsmichigan
Dannomyte
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 959
Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit

Postby moochman » Thu Aug 31, 2006 2:50 am

He looked nasty out there. Coming from the angle his pitches do, I don't think they'll be too many hitters being comfortable against him. It'll be interesting to see if he can keep his composure after someone knocks him around a bit.
Image
moochman
Major League Manager
Major League Manager

User avatar
Pick 3 Weekly WinnerSweet 16 SurvivorLucky Ladders Weekly Winner
Posts: 1649
Joined: 20 Jul 2003
Home Cafe: Football
Location: First place baby

Postby Dannomyte » Thu Aug 31, 2006 9:08 am

Dannomyte
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 959
Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit

Postby mcqfesijiba » Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:29 pm

That slider that hit Craig Wilson was actually an impressive pitch. It practically started on the inside part of the plate and broke all the way to Wilson's back knee. That's the kind of stuff lefty batters fear.
mcqfesijiba
Major League Manager
Major League Manager

User avatar

Posts: 1664
Joined: 31 Dec 2002
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit, MI

Postby moochman » Fri Sep 01, 2006 3:18 am

mcqfesijiba wrote:That slider that hit Craig Wilson was actually an impressive pitch. It practically started on the inside part of the plate and broke all the way to Wilson's back knee. That's the kind of stuff lefty batters fear.


That pitched reminded me of Randy Johnson in his prime. This kid has a chance to be a heck of a player. I can't believe that teams still pass on talent to save what is small money in the long run.
I think it is the same thinking the Tigers used to have: don't draft players with big time potential or else you'll have to pay them big cash throughout their careers. Silly short-sighted thinking that led us to 2003.
Image
moochman
Major League Manager
Major League Manager

User avatar
Pick 3 Weekly WinnerSweet 16 SurvivorLucky Ladders Weekly Winner
Posts: 1649
Joined: 20 Jul 2003
Home Cafe: Football
Location: First place baby

Postby Dannomyte » Sun Oct 29, 2006 5:59 pm

Prospect Q&A: Andrew Miller

Andrew Miller isn’t on Detroit’s postseason roster, but the 21-year-old lefthander has a front row seat to this year’s fall classic just months after helping pitch North Carolina to the finals of the College World Series.

The sixth overall pick in this year’s draft, Miller received a $3.55-million-dollar bonus and a major league contract after going 13-2, 2.48 and being named the 2006 Baseball America College Player of the Year.

Miller made his major league debut for the Tigers on August 30 after appearing in just three games with class high A Lakeland. Overall, the 6’7” native of Gainesville appeared in 8 games for the American League champions, losing his only decision while allowing 7 earned runs in 10 1/3 innings.

Baseball America: You're in St. Louis, watching your new team, the Detroit Tigers, play the Cardinals in the World Series. How would you describe what you're experiencing?

Andrew Miller: It’s neat. I’m in the dugout with the team, so I have the best possible seat in the house for someone who’s not playing. I’m mostly just trying to blend in, but it’s still a great first-hand experience to be here.

BA: You’re with guys like Justin Verlander and Joel Zumaya. Your former teammate at North Carolina, Daniel Bard, also brings some serious heat.

AM: Man, it’s great to be around guys like that. Verlander really gets it up there, but I’ve never seen anyone throw like Zumaya. But not many guys can throw like Daniel, either. And he doesn’t muscle it up there. He just throws, and it jumps out of his hand.

BA: How important is velocity to your game?

AM: Velocity is all good and well, but movement gets guys out. And your secondary pitches are just as big. Zumaya and Verlander can throw the ball by people, but they also have great curves. (Chris) Carpenter wasn’t throwing much more than 90 last night, but he was dominating us because he was mixing his pitches and locating.

BA: How many different pitches are you throwing right now?

AM: I have three fastballs: a 2-seamer, a 4-seamer, and a cutter. I have my slider, and I’m working on developing a better change because it’s a pitch you need in pro ball. I didn’t throw a single one in college this year. Right now it’s pretty much a run of the mill circle, which seems like the best grip for me because my hands aren’t all that large.

BA: How would you describe your slider?

AM: It’s essentially a curve from a lower arm-angle. You could actually say it’s more of a slurve, because it’s bigger than a slider. I don’t always throw it the same, though. Some are more sweeping, while others are tighter, and there’s as much as a six or seven miles an hour difference in the speed. For the catcher’s sake, I should almost call it two pitches.

BA: What were your expectations going into the draft?

AM: An hour before, I thought maybe I’d fall all the way to 25 or 26. It’s a crapshoot the way it works, so I wasn’t sure where I’d go. To be honest, I didn’t even know the Tigers were all that interested. That’s how they operate. They try to stay away from all the pre-draft banter, so it was a little surprising when they took me. But the more I learned about the organization, the happier I was. They really have things going in the right direction, and there’s definitely a commitment to young pitching.

BA: Your contract stipulated that you would be called up to the big league club this year. Why was that important to you?

AM: It wasn’t something that I brought up during negotiations . . . It wasn’t actually my idea. Regardless, I was going to be on the 40-man, so it wouldn’t be costing the team anything per se. Of course, it was great that they put it in there, because I’ve been learning so much. That doesn’t mean I’m content just to be here, though. I want to prove that I belong and be here for a long time.

BA: You made eight appearances after being called up to Detroit. What is the biggest thing you learned in those games?

AM: That I can get big league hitters out, but I have to throw strikes to do it. People will tell you that you have to trust your stuff, but that’s easier to say than do, especially when you’re facing big league hitters for the first time. But it’s amazing what I learned in 9 or 10 innings. I think I really accelerated my development by being here.

BA: How would you describe your big league debut?

AM: Probably my best outing, and something I’ll never forget. I think it took a couple of days to hit me that I had just been on the mound against the Yankees, and that I had broken Jeter’s bat.

BA: I've heard that you love to throw, and do a lot of long-tossing to build up arm-strength. What is your thought-process behind that?

AM: My arm just feels good when I’m throwing a lot. It’s sort of the Leo Mazzone philosophy of “the more you throw, the stronger you’ll be.” It makes sense. If your arm feels good, it’s kind of like: why wouldn’t you throw?

BA: I understand that you enjoy golfing. How would you compare golf to pitching?

AM: Let’s see . . . When you’re pitching, you’re facing an opponent, while in golf you’re battling the course. You need to think a stroke or two ahead, which is what you’re doing as a pitcher. Playing the ball to a certain side of the fairway, to set up your next shot, is kind of like setting up a hitter. If you swing too hard, you’re not going to have as much control. You need to stay in rhythm. I’ve never thought about it before, but there are definitely some analogies.

BA: Here’s a bit of a curveball: What are your mustache plans for the future?

AM: Oh, man. A bunch of us (at UNC) grew them this year, but most of our girlfriends made us shave them off. Unless they really come back into style someday . . . that was enough for a lifetime. I guess it can be fun to go out and embarrass yourself every day, but never again.

http://www.baseballamerica.com/today/pr ... 62725.html
Dannomyte
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 959
Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit

Postby Dannomyte » Sun Feb 18, 2007 1:34 am

No matter his talent, Miller will likely start in minors

LAKELAND, Fla. -- The first thing you need to know about Andrew Miller is that he does own a razor. Needs one, too, because the baby-faced Detroit Tigers pitcher of last year now owns a few whiskers, too.

On the tip of his chin, anyway.

"I have to shave,'' Miller said. "It's just that I have all these spots that I don't have to shave. I probably (shave) a few times a week, at least.''

Miller's whiskers aren't as important to the Tigers as his strong left arm, because as manager Jim Leyland said Saturday: "Talent-wise, he would be up near the head of the class in every camp in baseball.''

In fact, the 21-year-old Miller is so talented that in any recent spring, he'd have been at worst a long-shot candidate to make the Tigers' opening day staff. Remember, it wasn't that long ago that the Tigers came to spring training with only one definite starting pitcher.

This year, they have five definites, assuming Mike Maroth proves to be as healthy as he says he feels. Leyland talks now about who will be the Tigers' "sixth, seventh, eighth and maybe ninth'' starters, which is another way of saying he's auditioning candidates for jobs that may or may not exist at some point this summer.

Miller is one of those candidates, although as a No. 1 draft pick who has already pitched 10 1/3 big-league innings (and nearly made the World Series roster), he's of more interest than most of the others.

"That talent is extraordinary,'' Leyland said. "Guys like him, and (Justin) Verlander and (Joel) Zumaya.''

A year ago, of course, Verlander and Zumaya forced their way onto the Tiger roster with ultra-impressive spring trainings. The situation is different now, because the Tigers are a World Series team with a virtually set roster.

"It was good timing, on my part,'' Verlander said with a smile.

Miller doesn't look at it as bad timing on his part. He knows that he still hasn't started a professional game, that he pitched only five minor-league innings last summer, in three Class A relief outings.

"I've got plenty of work to do,'' he said. "I've had so little time. I think I've got a lot to learn. Watching these guys shows me how good they are, how much progress I have to make.

"I certainly think I can do it, but it's a process.''

That process will almost certainly continue in the minor leagues beginning in April. The Tigers want Miller to work as a starter, so it's extremely unlikely he could force his way onto the roster, no matter how impressive he is this spring.

He's in that sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth group, along with Chad Durbin, Zach Miner, Wilfredo Ledezma, Jordan Tata, Virgil Vasquez and Jair Jurrjens. Maybe Kyle Sleeth should be in that group, too, because the injury-plagued former No. 1 draft pick turned heads in Saturday's workout.

Miller stands out, and not just because he's the (still) baby-faced youngster who stands 6-foot-6. He's the biggest name in the group, and the biggest talent, too.

He's the one you definitely need to know about. You should know, for example, that even though he played baseball at the University of North Carolina, he's as rabid a Florida Gator fan as you'd ever want to meet.

"I lived (in Gainesville, Fla.) for 18 years,'' Miller said. "I think that counts as much as anyone who went there for four years.''

Miner and Ledezma, in addition to being candidates for a starter role, are also candidates for the bullpen, with Ledezma already penciled in for a spot. But Leyland said both would be stretched out with at least a three-inning appearance at some point during the spring. . . . Leyland raved about Jose Mesa, the 40-year-old right-hander the Tigers signed to pitch early setup innings in front of Zumaya and Fernando Rodney. "He's a true professional,'' Leyland said. "There'll be nobody in this camp that outworks Jose Mesa. His work habits are tremendous.'' . . . Leyland on Gary Sheffield: "He doesn't have a vicious bone in his body, not one. I can guarantee you these guys will love Gary Sheffield. His teammates will love Gary Sheffield. He'll be fine -- unless he doesn't hit.''

http://www.mlive.com/tigers/stories/ind ... thispage=1

Image
Dannomyte
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 959
Joined: 31 Jan 2005
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Detroit

PreviousNext

Return to Detroit Tigers

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Forums Articles & Tips Sleepers Rankings Leagues


  • Fantasy Baseball
  • Article Submissions
  • Privacy Statement
  • Site Survey 
  • Contact