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Coppermine's bored...

Postby Omaha Red Sox » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:32 pm

...so here are some short stories to discuss....

62-year-old British woman gives birth

Sun Jul 9, 11:38 PM ET

LONDON - A 62-year-old child psychologist has given birth to a boy, becoming the oldest British woman to have a baby.

Patti Farrant — known professionally as Patricia Rashbrook — delivered her son, J.J., by Caesarean section on Wednesday, according to The Daily Mail newspaper. The baby was conceived after fertility treatments.

Farrant has three grown children from a previous marriage. It is the first child for her husband, John, 60, an education management consultant.

"He is adorable, and seeing him for the first time was beyond words," she told the newspaper. "Having been through so much to have him, we are overjoyed. His birth was absolutely wonderful and deeply moving for both of us."

Other older British mothers include Liz Buttle, from Wales, who was 60 when she gave birth to a son in 1997.

The oldest woman in the world to give birth is believed to be Romanian Adriana Iliescu, who was 66 when she had a daughter in Bucharest in January 2005.


Malaysian man in deadly earnest to prove he's still alive

7 minutes ago

KUALA LUMPUR (AFP) - A Malaysian appealed for help after authorities ruled him dead more than four years ago, saying he was unable to work because of the mistake.

According to official records, Minggu Mang anak Madang died from head injuries in the town of Bintulu in the eastern state of Sarawak on January 18, 2002, and was buried.

But Minggu Mang, 40, said he was alive and had been fighting for years to prove to authorities he was not dead.

"Please help me to convince the authorities concerned that I am not dead. I am very much alive," he was quoted by the state Bernama news agency as saying.

"The going has been very tough, very stressful since I was officially certified dead by the Nyalau Hospital in Bintulu four years ago."

Minggu Mang said he had found out about the mistake when he went to renew his driver's license on December 19, 2003.

The former building contractor, who is married with three children, said he was told all his records with the transport department had been erased as he had been certified dead.

Minggu Mang, who has since been struggling to prove he is alive, said he could not work since he no longer officially exists -- a situation he labelled "ridiculous."

"Now I am the living dead as I cannot work," he said, adding he had complained to police over the matter.

"There seems to be no clear indication when the investigations will end. I know the police are doing their best but I have a life to live," he said.

Minggu also called for authorities to investigate the people who reported his death and work out who actually died and was buried.


British children to get happiness lessons

Sun Jul 9, 12:04 PM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Some 2,000 pupils at English state schools are to have special classes in happiness under a pilot scheme aimed at cutting depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour.
"Schoolchildren will take self-esteem classes to raise standards and cut crime," according to the Independent on Sunday newspaper.

"Lessons in happiness are to be introduced for 11-year-olds in state schools to combat a huge rise in depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour among young people.

"Special behavioural techniques imported from the US will be used from September next year in an attempt to make children more resilient in the face of the pressures of 21st century living."

It said Professor Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania in the United States had been drafted in to train British teachers in the subject.

Lessons will include role play designed to help children build up self-esteem, challenge negative ways of thinking and express thoughts clearly.

"They will also be shown special breathing exercises to keep them calm when their parents are arguing and avoid blaming themselves for situations that are beyond their control, for example, the fact their parents may be divorcing."

The Department for Education was expected to evaluate the programme, the newspaper said.

"If it proves as successful as it has been in the US, happiness classes could become part of the regular school timetable.

"The move comes as experts warn that record numbers of young people are on the verge of mental breakdown as a result of family break-up, exam pressures and growing inability to cope with the pressures of modern life," the report said.
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby Coppermine » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:01 pm

62-year-old British woman gives birth

Sun Jul 9, 11:38 PM ET

LONDON - A 62-year-old child psychologist has given birth to a boy, becoming the oldest British woman to have a baby.

Patti Farrant — known professionally as Patricia Rashbrook — delivered her son, J.J., by Caesarean section on Wednesday, according to The Daily Mail newspaper. The baby was conceived after fertility treatments.

Farrant has three grown children from a previous marriage. It is the first child for her husband, John, 60, an education management consultant.

"He is adorable, and seeing him for the first time was beyond words," she told the newspaper. "Having been through so much to have him, we are overjoyed. His birth was absolutely wonderful and deeply moving for both of us."

Other older British mothers include Liz Buttle, from Wales, who was 60 when she gave birth to a son in 1997.

The oldest woman in the world to give birth is believed to be Romanian Adriana Iliescu, who was 66 when she had a daughter in Bucharest in January 2005.


Bah, with the way hormone treatments are today, i could take them and give birth.

Malaysian man in deadly earnest to prove he's still alive

7 minutes ago

KUALA LUMPUR (AFP) - A Malaysian appealed for help after authorities ruled him dead more than four years ago, saying he was unable to work because of the mistake.

According to official records, Minggu Mang anak Madang died from head injuries in the town of Bintulu in the eastern state of Sarawak on January 18, 2002, and was buried.

But Minggu Mang, 40, said he was alive and had been fighting for years to prove to authorities he was not dead.

"Please help me to convince the authorities concerned that I am not dead. I am very much alive," he was quoted by the state Bernama news agency as saying.

"The going has been very tough, very stressful since I was officially certified dead by the Nyalau Hospital in Bintulu four years ago."

Minggu Mang said he had found out about the mistake when he went to renew his driver's license on December 19, 2003.

The former building contractor, who is married with three children, said he was told all his records with the transport department had been erased as he had been certified dead.

Minggu Mang, who has since been struggling to prove he is alive, said he could not work since he no longer officially exists -- a situation he labelled "ridiculous."

"Now I am the living dead as I cannot work," he said, adding he had complained to police over the matter.

"There seems to be no clear indication when the investigations will end. I know the police are doing their best but I have a life to live," he said.

Minggu also called for authorities to investigate the people who reported his death and work out who actually died and was buried.


I suffered head injuries myself when I tried to pronounce "Minggu Mang anak Madang"

British children to get happiness lessons

Sun Jul 9, 12:04 PM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Some 2,000 pupils at English state schools are to have special classes in happiness under a pilot scheme aimed at cutting depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour.
"Schoolchildren will take self-esteem classes to raise standards and cut crime," according to the Independent on Sunday newspaper.

"Lessons in happiness are to be introduced for 11-year-olds in state schools to combat a huge rise in depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour among young people.

"Special behavioural techniques imported from the US will be used from September next year in an attempt to make children more resilient in the face of the pressures of 21st century living."

It said Professor Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania in the United States had been drafted in to train British teachers in the subject.

Lessons will include role play designed to help children build up self-esteem, challenge negative ways of thinking and express thoughts clearly.

"They will also be shown special breathing exercises to keep them calm when their parents are arguing and avoid blaming themselves for situations that are beyond their control, for example, the fact their parents may be divorcing."

The Department for Education was expected to evaluate the programme, the newspaper said.

"If it proves as successful as it has been in the US, happiness classes could become part of the regular school timetable.

"The move comes as experts warn that record numbers of young people are on the verge of mental breakdown as a result of family break-up, exam pressures and growing inability to cope with the pressures of modern life," the report said.


You know what would make me happy? If the British would stop spelling "program" with two M's and an E.
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby mak1277 » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:21 pm

Omaha Red Sox wrote:...so here are some short stories to discuss....
British children to get happiness lessons

Sun Jul 9, 12:04 PM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Some 2,000 pupils at English state schools are to have special classes in happiness under a pilot scheme aimed at cutting depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour.
"Schoolchildren will take self-esteem classes to raise standards and cut crime," according to the Independent on Sunday newspaper.

"Lessons in happiness are to be introduced for 11-year-olds in state schools to combat a huge rise in depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour among young people.

"Special behavioural techniques imported from the US will be used from September next year in an attempt to make children more resilient in the face of the pressures of 21st century living."

It said Professor Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania in the United States had been drafted in to train British teachers in the subject.

Lessons will include role play designed to help children build up self-esteem, challenge negative ways of thinking and express thoughts clearly.

"They will also be shown special breathing exercises to keep them calm when their parents are arguing and avoid blaming themselves for situations that are beyond their control, for example, the fact their parents may be divorcing."

The Department for Education was expected to evaluate the programme, the newspaper said.

"If it proves as successful as it has been in the US, happiness classes could become part of the regular school timetable.

"The move comes as experts warn that record numbers of young people are on the verge of mental breakdown as a result of family break-up, exam pressures and growing inability to cope with the pressures of modern life," the report said.


This disturbs me. There is so much focus on making sure kids' self esteem isn't bruised that every kid ends up thinking he/she is great at everything. News flash kids...you aren't. You probably are average, as a matter of fact. What a harsh reality when stepping into the real world (college, job market, etc.). "But mommy and daddy and my teachers all said I was 'special'". Nope, sorry, not special, Junior. Repeat after me, "Do you want fries with that?".

When these kids get into the real world and realize they aren't all that special, THAT's what is going to piss them off and make them depressed.
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby Coppermine » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:27 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Omaha Red Sox wrote:...so here are some short stories to discuss....
British children to get happiness lessons

Sun Jul 9, 12:04 PM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Some 2,000 pupils at English state schools are to have special classes in happiness under a pilot scheme aimed at cutting depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour.
"Schoolchildren will take self-esteem classes to raise standards and cut crime," according to the Independent on Sunday newspaper.

"Lessons in happiness are to be introduced for 11-year-olds in state schools to combat a huge rise in depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour among young people.

"Special behavioural techniques imported from the US will be used from September next year in an attempt to make children more resilient in the face of the pressures of 21st century living."

It said Professor Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania in the United States had been drafted in to train British teachers in the subject.

Lessons will include role play designed to help children build up self-esteem, challenge negative ways of thinking and express thoughts clearly.

"They will also be shown special breathing exercises to keep them calm when their parents are arguing and avoid blaming themselves for situations that are beyond their control, for example, the fact their parents may be divorcing."

The Department for Education was expected to evaluate the programme, the newspaper said.

"If it proves as successful as it has been in the US, happiness classes could become part of the regular school timetable.

"The move comes as experts warn that record numbers of young people are on the verge of mental breakdown as a result of family break-up, exam pressures and growing inability to cope with the pressures of modern life," the report said.


This disturbs me. There is so much focus on making sure kids' self esteem isn't bruised that every kid ends up thinking he/she is great at everything. News flash kids...you aren't. You probably are average, as a matter of fact. What a harsh reality when stepping into the real world (college, job market, etc.). "But mommy and daddy and my teachers all said I was 'special'". Nope, sorry, not special, Junior. Repeat after me, "Do you want fries with that?".

When these kids get into the real world and realize they aren't all that special, THAT's what is going to piss them off and make them depressed.


I also agree with that completely and I think most of you on here would as well. That's the same I reason I don't think all criticism should be constructive... sometimes people just need to be told when they suck.
If you're a battery, you're either working or you're dead....
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby teddy ballgame » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:32 pm

Coppermine wrote:
mak1277 wrote:
Omaha Red Sox wrote:...so here are some short stories to discuss....
British children to get happiness lessons

Sun Jul 9, 12:04 PM ET

LONDON (AFP) - Some 2,000 pupils at English state schools are to have special classes in happiness under a pilot scheme aimed at cutting depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour.
"Schoolchildren will take self-esteem classes to raise standards and cut crime," according to the Independent on Sunday newspaper.

"Lessons in happiness are to be introduced for 11-year-olds in state schools to combat a huge rise in depression, self-harm and anti-social behaviour among young people.

"Special behavioural techniques imported from the US will be used from September next year in an attempt to make children more resilient in the face of the pressures of 21st century living."

It said Professor Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania in the United States had been drafted in to train British teachers in the subject.

Lessons will include role play designed to help children build up self-esteem, challenge negative ways of thinking and express thoughts clearly.

"They will also be shown special breathing exercises to keep them calm when their parents are arguing and avoid blaming themselves for situations that are beyond their control, for example, the fact their parents may be divorcing."

The Department for Education was expected to evaluate the programme, the newspaper said.

"If it proves as successful as it has been in the US, happiness classes could become part of the regular school timetable.

"The move comes as experts warn that record numbers of young people are on the verge of mental breakdown as a result of family break-up, exam pressures and growing inability to cope with the pressures of modern life," the report said.


This disturbs me. There is so much focus on making sure kids' self esteem isn't bruised that every kid ends up thinking he/she is great at everything. News flash kids...you aren't. You probably are average, as a matter of fact. What a harsh reality when stepping into the real world (college, job market, etc.). "But mommy and daddy and my teachers all said I was 'special'". Nope, sorry, not special, Junior. Repeat after me, "Do you want fries with that?".

When these kids get into the real world and realize they aren't all that special, THAT's what is going to piss them off and make them depressed.


I also agree with that completely and I think most of you on here would as well. That's the same I reason I don't think all criticism should be constructive... sometimes people just need to be told when they suck.

Agreed. Society sure didn't used to try and make kids feel happy about everything. Kids used to get a swift kick in the rear end for doing stupid things. Seems like this generation of parents, and older are perfectly happy today and weren't raised with this paranoia of making sure that when they were kids they weren't depressed.
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Postby Coppermine » Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:54 pm

This reminds me of one of the best online articles I've ever read; and I think it may have been posted on here originally; check it out if you have a few minutes:

Ronald Bailey wrote:Earlier this week, the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC, held a remarkably interesting conference titled "Panic Attack: The New Precautionary Culture, the Politics of Fear, and the Risks to Innovation." It was interesting not only because I was a participant, but because it looked at how many Western countries are losing their cultural nerve, as evidenced by the increasing cultural acceptance of the so-called precautionary principle.

The strongest versions of the precautionary principle demand that innovators prove that their inventions will never cause harm before they are allowed to deploy or sell them. In other words, if an action might cause harm, then inaction is preferable. The problem is that all new activities, especially those involving scientific research and technological innovation, always carry some risks. Attempting to avoid all risk is a recipe for technological and economic stagnation.

At the AEI conference, University of Kent sociologist, Frank Furedi, summed up the danger of this loss of cultural nerve in a talk based on his new book Politics Of Fear: Beyond Left And Right. He identified five trends fueling the rise of risk aversion in Western cultures.

First, Furedi argued that there has been a shift in moral reaction to harm. People no longer believe in natural disasters or acts of God. Today, people suspect that someone is behind a disaster—an irresponsible corporation or a cowardly bureaucrat. Indeed, accidents don't happen anymore; they have been redefined as preventable injuries.

Furedi argued that many of us now assume that every negative experience has some inner meaning. For example, when a teenager dies in a car crash, grieving parents regularly tell television reporters, "There is lesson to be learned from Johnny's death." The lesson usually is not that bad things randomly happen to good people, but that our roads don't have enough guard rails, or that we should enact laws to prevent teenagers from driving with friends and so forth.

Furedi sees this kind of thinking as a return to pre-modern days of higher superstition, where every event has a deeper meaning. In the medieval era, the hand of God or the malevolent influence of Satan explained why people suffered misfortunes. Today the malevolent hand of government or corporate America is to blame for every catastrophe.

A second factor that Furedi sees contributing to our culture of risk aversion is that the nature of harms is represented in increasingly dramatic fashion. People are no longer expected to rise above adversity or encouraged to get on with their lives after they experience a hard knock. They are instead victims who are "scarred for life" and perpetually "haunted" by their misfortunes. Even the timescale of disaster has expanded. Anything that happens now produces consequences that you can never predict. Thus you have to be very careful about what you do today and worry about what might happen decades down the road. Treating people as permanent victims and constantly speculating about possible future harms is a recipe for social and economic paralysis.

The fear that actions like inventing new medicines, chemicals, and energy sources might have unknowable, irreversible, and ultimately catastrophic effects in the future leads to Furedi's third factor. Even as more people are living longer and healthier lives, life is perceived as a very dangerous thing. The boundary between analysis and speculation is eroded as worst case scenarios proliferate. What if an asteroid hits us; what if biotech wheat gets out of control; what if Iraq is giving weapons of mass destruction to terrorists? Worst case thinking decreases our cultural capacity to deal with uncertainty. Risk becomes something to avoid, not an opportunity to be seized.

The fourth trend that Furedi sees is the increasing treatment of safety as in end in itself. Furedi is not opposed to safety as a technical issue, of course, but he is against treating safety as a moral principle. Today, safety often acquires a "pseudo-moral" connotation as in "safe spaces," "safe medicine," and "safe sex." Furedi offered a personal story to illustrate what he meant. When he took his son to his new school, the principal told him, "Don't worry, our number one priority is your child's safety." Furedi responded, "I was hoping it was teaching him to read and write and do maths." A fifth trend that arises from our increasingly precautionary culture is a radical redefinition of personhood. People no longer believe that we have the capacity to cope and to act. We no longer really believe in the idea of individual autonomy. People are helplessly addicted to sex, alcohol, or shopping. People are represented as weak and vulnerable. More and more groups—children, women, minorities—are defined as "vulnerable." Policy is focused on reassuring and supporting people, and risk taking is stigmatized.

Despite these trends, Western countries still manage to innovate and take risks. Furedi acknowledges that in the physical world we still create all kinds of new technologies and are going ahead in a dramatic and positive fashion. He was advised to go to Silicon Valley to find real risk takers and he did find driven creative people working hard to create new technologies. But Furedi pointed out that the refrigerators of these same swashbuckling techno-entrepreneurs are chock full of pesticide-free produce; they abhor tobacco; drink just half a glass of wine with dinner; and wear knee pads, elbow pads, and helmets to go bike riding. "In terms of their lifestyles, they are very very precautionary, pussycats basically," said Furedi.

"But in the world of meaning, however, we've become very very confused," he argued. Furedi pointed to corporate advertising, which is seldom overtly about business or profits. Instead ads show blue skies and an interracial mixture of babies frolicking happily together. Corporations find it difficult to affirm culturally what they are really doing, that is, creating products, providing services, and making profits. To be called a risk taker used to be considered a compliment; it now carries generally negative connotations. Risk taking is just short of pedophilia in provoking social opprobrium. "Today, no one is criticized for not taking risks," said Furedi.

In the end, Furedi was very good at diagnosing what is wrong with our contemporary culture of fear, but he had very few concrete suggestions about how to restore people's belief in progress and the power of human creativity.

In 1982, the superbrilliant thinker Herman Kahn published The Coming Boom in which he pleaded for the reestablishment of "an ideology of progress." Kahn warned:

Two out of three Americans polled in recent years believe that their grandchildren will not live as well as they do, i.e., they tend to believe the vision of the future that is taught in our school system. Almost every child is told that we are running out of resources; that we are robbing future generations when we use these scarce, irreplaceable, or nonrenewable resources in silly, frivolous and wasteful ways; that we are callously polluting the environment beyond control; that we are recklessly destroying the ecology beyond repair; that we are knowingly distributing foods which give people cancer and other ailments but continue to do so in order to make a profit. It would be hard to describe a more unhealthy, immoral, and disastrous educational context, every element of which is either largely incorrect, misleading, overstated, or just plain wrong. What the school system describes, and what so many Americans believe, is a prescription for low morale, higher prices and greater (and unnecessary) regulations.

Kahn turned out to be right about the boom, but most of the intellectual class is still burdened with an anti-progress ideology that remains a significant drag on scientific, technological and policy innovation. As Furedi and Kahn point out, overcoming the pervasive pessimism of the intellectual class is the major piece of work left for us to do in the 21st century.


http://www.reason.com/rb/rb021706.shtml

;-D
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby Omaha Red Sox » Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:09 pm

teddy ballgame wrote:
Coppermine wrote:
mak1277 wrote:
Omaha Red Sox wrote:...so here are some short stories to discuss....
British children to get happiness lessons


This disturbs me. There is so much focus on making sure kids' self esteem isn't bruised that every kid ends up thinking he/she is great at everything. News flash kids...you aren't. You probably are average, as a matter of fact. What a harsh reality when stepping into the real world (college, job market, etc.). "But mommy and daddy and my teachers all said I was 'special'". Nope, sorry, not special, Junior. Repeat after me, "Do you want fries with that?".

When these kids get into the real world and realize they aren't all that special, THAT's what is going to piss them off and make them depressed.


I also agree with that completely and I think most of you on here would as well. That's the same I reason I don't think all criticism should be constructive... sometimes people just need to be told when they suck.

Agreed. Society sure didn't used to try and make kids feel happy about everything. Kids used to get a swift kick in the rear end for doing stupid things. Seems like this generation of parents, and older are perfectly happy today and weren't raised with this paranoia of making sure that when they were kids they weren't depressed.


Some very good points. I'm tired of the no-losers society. Me and my kid play all kinds of games and, you know what? Sometimes...this may shock some people, so brace yourselves......he loses. He doesn't like to lose, because he knows what losing is and how it feels. He works very hard to make sure he doesn't lose again and comes back and beats his old man. Too many kids don't try because they don't think they have to.
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby teddy ballgame » Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:20 pm

Omaha Red Sox wrote:
teddy ballgame wrote:
Coppermine wrote:
mak1277 wrote:
Omaha Red Sox wrote:...so here are some short stories to discuss....
British children to get happiness lessons


This disturbs me. There is so much focus on making sure kids' self esteem isn't bruised that every kid ends up thinking he/she is great at everything. News flash kids...you aren't. You probably are average, as a matter of fact. What a harsh reality when stepping into the real world (college, job market, etc.). "But mommy and daddy and my teachers all said I was 'special'". Nope, sorry, not special, Junior. Repeat after me, "Do you want fries with that?".

When these kids get into the real world and realize they aren't all that special, THAT's what is going to piss them off and make them depressed.


I also agree with that completely and I think most of you on here would as well. That's the same I reason I don't think all criticism should be constructive... sometimes people just need to be told when they suck.

Agreed. Society sure didn't used to try and make kids feel happy about everything. Kids used to get a swift kick in the rear end for doing stupid things. Seems like this generation of parents, and older are perfectly happy today and weren't raised with this paranoia of making sure that when they were kids they weren't depressed.


Some very good points. I'm tired of the no-losers society. Me and my kid play all kinds of games and, you know what? Sometimes...this may shock some people, so brace yourselves......he loses. He doesn't like to lose, because he knows what losing is and how it feels. He works very hard to make sure he doesn't lose again and comes back and beats his old man. Too many kids don't try because they don't think they have to.

I remember one time I was playing street hockey with my dad, and I asked him to stop playing so hard because he was beating me every time. He started letting me score and it wasn't fun at all. Never asked him to do that again, and like ORS said, it made me try harder and want to beat him even more.
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Postby mak1277 » Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:40 pm

Coppermine wrote:This reminds me of one of the best online articles I've ever read; and I think it may have been posted on here originally; check it out if you have a few minutes:

Ronald Bailey wrote:Earlier this week, the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC, held a remarkably interesting conference titled "Panic Attack: The New Precautionary Culture, the Politics of Fear, and the Risks to Innovation."...


http://www.reason.com/rb/rb021706.shtml

;-D


Really excellent read...thanks.
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Re: Coppermine's bored...

Postby mak1277 » Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:44 pm

teddy ballgame wrote:I remember one time I was playing street hockey with my dad, and I asked him to stop playing so hard because he was beating me every time. He started letting me score and it wasn't fun at all. Never asked him to do that again, and like ORS said, it made me try harder and want to beat him even more.


This all goes hand-in-hand with the enormous sense of entitlement kids have these days. I'm not an old geezer (i'm only almost 30), but even the kids that are graduating college these days seem to have this enormous sense that they are entitled to whatever they want.

When I came out of college, I was thrilled to get a job at all. Now, the kids being hired by my company seem to think the company is lucky to have hired them. They don't work very hard (most, not all of them). They do things that I wouldn't have dreamed of doing in my wildest imagination (disregarding orders from their bosses, for example).
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