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Auction Draft Strategy???

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Postby redsox588 » Sat Feb 04, 2006 12:37 pm

Thanks surfs, those were some great tips. This is a non keeper and thru all this advice I think i've learned a few things (tell me if i'm right, or should add any more knowledge)

-Dont fall in love with a player, go by my projected value

-Drive up the price on some players, but only if i'm sure the other player will give in, and dont make it a habit

-Hang back somewhat, but don't wait too long, and pounce on a player if he fits in my price range

-Be aggressive but not too aggressive, always allow myself to have money towards the end for bargains

Questions:

-Should I lay low for the first couple players (probably a-rod, pujols) to sense what the bidding patterns of my league are?

-Should I call out players names in the order that I would a regular draft, an example would be...calling out Rickie Weeks name first, because I think hes a good sleeper. Would that seem to overzealous?
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Postby looptid » Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:45 pm

-A general rule thrown around in a lot of publications and on a number of websites is to only spend 78% for every projected dollar. If you have Dan Haren projected to be worth $20, don't bid any higher than $16. The thinking is that a team with $260 of projected value in a league with a $260 cap will finish in the middle of the pack, and that you really nead about $333 worth of value to run away with the title.

-If you don't mind doing some math during the draft (or setting up a spreadsheet to do it for you), make sure you increase the percentage you expect to spend as you collect more value. If you can get David Dellucci for $2 and have him projected at $9, subtract just $2 from your $260 cap while subtracting $9 from your $333 targeted team value. You wind up with $258 left to spend to get $324 worth of value, which means you can now bid up to 80% of a player's projected value.

-If you have an experienced league, the owners will hold a lot of the same views others in this thread do... that teams will overspend early because they have a lot of money. Early on in the auction in a savy veteran league is the perfect time to go for undervalued players. I won the first two players I called out in my auction league last season... Dellucci at $2 and Gary Matthews Jr. at $7 (this is an AL-only league). Everyone was saving their money for bigger names and the later stages of the draft, and I filled two of my five outfield spots for cheap getting good value... of course, if your league has a lot of newer owners, what has been said in the thread already is the gospel; stay out of bidding wars early and save your money (if you are using the sliding 78% ratio, overbidding should never be a problem anyway).

-Keep track of every other team. It is a lot of work, but it pays off at the end of the draft. Know which positions you and every other team still have to fill, and know how much cap space the other teams have left. Head-to-head bidding at the end of the draft is much easier to navigate if you know how much someone has to spend and which positions they need. When calling out players towards the end of the draft, focus on the big names left at positions you have already filled to get rid of other teams' cap space (in some leagues, in order to do this you have to keep your DH spot open, as they will not let you bid on positions you have already filled).

That's my advice. Take it for what it is worth. I did spend $27 on Mark Bellhorn and Calvin Pickering last season. :-b
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Postby TheYanks04 » Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:58 pm

One of the absolute worst things you can do is call out the top players you want early. Let others do want they want, but you should try to call out player that you do NOT want. If they are top players that is fine, but no ranking should be assigned.

For instance, I hate Podsednik and Pierre as Roto players. Will never spend big bucks to put either of them on my roster. I know someone will though, so these are the perfect guys to bring up to auction the second the elite SB guys like Crawford, Furcal, Figgins, Reyes, Abreau etc are gone.

Someone gets edgy and overpays for SBs and I am more than willing to let them. I bid the $1 opening bid and sit back. Don't care what price they ultimately goes for. That is that many dollars my opponents do not have anymore to use against me on somone I do want.

Same for any player you basically know has value but you also know you really do not like or will not pay top dollar for. Injury risks, over-hyped rookies, etc. Another guy to call out early is Felix Hernandez. SO much hype. Make someone pay top dollar for him and his potential. Even if he lives up to it, so what?...you get them to pay top dollar for a SP that is unproven and draw down their cash. And I would never bid top dollar on an unproven rookie SP.
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Postby Surfs up » Sat Feb 04, 2006 4:15 pm

We cannot call out a player if that spot is filled. Example. If my outfield and DH spots are filled I can't call out a player like Sheffield. We must have a spot open.
It works with bidding the same way. You must have a spot open .
Another rule of thumb is to bid on most players called out. Some guys are smart at picking up on the players owners want when those are the only players they bid on. Besides if you don't wnat them and bid it ups the price to the next guy but be very careful .
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Postby TheYanks04 » Sat Feb 04, 2006 4:22 pm

Surfs up wrote:We cannot call out a player if that spot is filled. Example. If my outfield and DH spots are filled I can't call out a player like Sheffield. We must have a spot open.
It works with bidding the same way. You must have a spot open .
Another rule of thumb is to bid on most players called out. Some guys are smart at picking up on the players owners want when those are the only players they bid on. Besides if you don't wnat them and bid it ups the price to the next guy but be very careful .


Unless you play without a bench, that is a pretty silly rule imo. If you have a bench, then you should be allowed to bid on anyone you want at any time as long as you stay within budget imo.
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Postby looptid » Sat Feb 04, 2006 4:36 pm

That's how the original rules for Rotisserie Baseball were set up by Okrent and his lot... $260 cap for the full 23 man starting roster (9 P, 2 C, 1B, 2B, 3B, SS, MI, CI, 5 OF, UTIL) and then a draft to fill out the reserve roster (or bench). A lot of older leagues use the original rules from when Rotisserie Baseball was invented, where all 23 players won at auction are in the starting line-up, so you have to fill each position by the end of the auction and need a position for every player won.

So much negativity, Yanks. Can I FedEx you a hug?
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Postby Surfs up » Sun Feb 05, 2006 10:52 am

TheYanks04 We do have a reserve squad but we have to use faab money to buy the players we want. We start with $75.00 and each player cost a min,. of $5.00. The catch is bidding.We also have each two picks that can be used for either minor leaguers or major leaguers which is done after the draft. We can have up to five reserve players and five minor league players.Picks can be traded in the off season. I have five picks going into the draft. And I have two minor leaguers already. Once a minor leaguer has been called up to the majors we have two weeks to activate him. If the major league reserve is full somebody has to go.
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Postby olympia0731 » Sun Feb 05, 2006 11:42 am

My goal in a auction leaque is to leave the auction with 333 dollars of projected value. Using the 78% rule you should be able to acieve this goal.

A few tips.

1: See what cats are undervalued in your leaque. Maybe pitchers are undervalued. If any of the above is true use it to your advantage.

2: Make sure you have a solid strategy for your entire season not just your draft. Example:
My leaque undervalues pitchers. My strategy this year is Conserve money untill 6 round where in my leaque dollar per value ratio increases. Stack up High strikeout pitchers to trade away to teams that need pitching. Hoard 2basemen (Draft two of the top three at the position) in order to drive up prices on mediocre ones, and trade away for weakness once the season starts. MAKE SURE TO GET 333 DOLLARS OF VALUE. Keep my bench flexible so that I can pick up players from the waiver wire without dropping valuable players. Once the season starts acquire young phenoms and trade away to teams that need to rebuild.

3: MY NUMBER ONE RULE IS TO STAY TENACIOUS ALL SEASON>

PS: FEEL FREE TO STEAL MY STRATEGY.

hope this helps.
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Postby Hbj79 » Sun Feb 05, 2006 11:47 am

1)Find the players who will go for the most money but that you don't want and call them early. So if you hate Jeter call him out first. Get other people to spend their money.

2)You will have to pay actual value to get a star player and you will want to get atleast one. Still don't overpay.

3)You want to put more of your budget into hitting as cheap pitchers are more readily available towards the end of the auction.
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Postby swyck » Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:23 pm

I'm not sure how that 78% rule can work.

In general players will go for their value, some higher and some lower. If everyone has Dan Haren at $20, and you will only go to $16, chances are that you wont get Dan Haren.

Near the end, when there is no money availabe, there are plenty of value picks. Then you can get $1-3 players that are worth much more, but I dont think that's what you meant by the rule. Unless you mean hold back until you just scarf up everyone cheap at the end, but then you wont even spend your $260.

Come to think of it, I got Dan Haren for $4 near the end of the draft, and I had him at $14, so maybe there's something to this.

Still, I just dont see that many good players going for 78% of their value. It sounds like a good idea, but how do you implement it in practice?

Actually I just went over my draft results, and my team values came in at $332. DOH! 8-o That is an amazing coincidence considering I started this reply questioning the validity of this concept.

I wasn't trying to do any such 78% thing, but I was trying to get people below their value where I could. I did overbid a couple of times, but not by a lot. I change my mind, this is a great strategy, LOL!
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