New non-political hurricane Katrina thread - Fantasy Baseball Cafe 2014 Fantasy Baseball Cafe
100% Deposit Bonus for Cafe Members!

Return to General Talk

New non-political hurricane Katrina thread

Moderator: Baseball Moderators

New non-political hurricane Katrina thread

Postby Mookie4ever » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:04 am

Some less-mature posters caused the last thread to be locked. This is another thread for people to discuss non-political related hurricane issues.

I will be keeping an eye open for use of the words Bush, Clinton, Republican and Democrat. edit: add Afghanistan and Iraq to this list.

Since there have already been reminders and a thread closed the next step will have to be yellow cards for repeat offences :-/
Last edited by Mookie4ever on Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
Image
Mookie4ever
Head Moderator
Head Moderator

User avatar
ModeratorCafeholicFantasy ExpertCafe WriterMock(ing) DrafterEagle EyeCafe SpotterHockey ModBasketball ModFootball ModMatchup Meltdown ChampionPick 3 Weekly WinnerSweet 16 SurvivorLucky Ladders Weekly Winner
Posts: 19545
(Past Year: 280)
Joined: 17 Dec 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Hakuna, Montana

Postby acsguitar » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:07 am

Ok this isn't political but JT brought up saying the destruction from this hurricane doesn't even compare the the destruction of 9/11 or something to that effect.

I want to know what he ment by that. IMO this is way more destruction then 9/11 was.. Probably more deaths Definitly way more property destruction not trying to start an arguement just wanted to know if thats what he ment.

word ;-)
I'm too lazy to make a sig at the moment
acsguitar
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
Graphics Expert
Posts: 26722
Joined: 7 Apr 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Back in General Talk WOOO!!!

Re: New non-political hurricane Katerina thread

Postby wrveres » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:15 am

How well prepared was New Orleans for such a storm?

The city is especially vulnerable because much of it sits below sea level. Local, state and federal officials have worked for years preparing plans for evacuation and local shelter. The giant Superdome was first used as a shelter in 1998 when Hurricane Georges threatened the city. Just last summer, officials conducted an exercise to prepare for a major hurricane in New Orleans, concluding that as many as a million people might be forced from their homes and that some shelters would be needed for as long as 100 days.

Why wasn't everyone evacuated?

A mandatory evacuation was ordered when it became apparent the storm track would take it close to the city. Hundreds of thousands responded, but many didn't have the means to leave. Of those remaining behind, thousands sought shelter in the Superdome. "Sometimes people refuse to be taken away," Federal Emergency Management Agency director Michael Brown said.

Why wasn't aid available sooner?

Food, water and other supplies, as well as search and rescue teams, were brought in in advance of the storm. "In New Orleans we were ready to move in as soon as Katrina moved out," but levee failures then made it unsafe to move into many parts of the city, Brown said.

Why is government aid being sent by ship instead of by air?

Airports at New Orleans and nearby Gulfport, Miss., were closed because of storm damage. The New Orleans airport has reopened only for humanitarian supply flights, which are landing there in daylight hours. Assistance also is being delivered by trucks, ships and by airplanes landing at other nearby cities.

Why did the levees fail?

According to the Army Corps of Engineers, the levees were designed to withstand a Category 3 storm, the middle level in a system (1 to 5) that measures hurricane intensity. The force of Katrina was more than the levee could withstand, the Corps said. The agency was to begin a feasibility next year on what it would take to protect the city from stronger, category 4 or 5 storms.

How long will it take to drain the city?

A: The Corps of Engineers says it cannot yet estimate the time. It will depend on the weather and how soon repairs to levees are completed. The pumps can then begin sending the water into nearby waterways. The city has pumps and additional ones can be brought in, but electricity is still out so generators will be needed. It's not like pulling the plug on a bathtub drain; much of the city is below sea level so the water will have to be pumped up and out.

Is it true cruise ships will be used for those forced out of their homes?

Both Brown and the cruise ship industry report they are talking about this possibility.

Thanks JT ;-D
wrveres
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicFantasy ExpertCafe WriterEagle EyeInnovative MemberCafe Musketeer
Posts: 31783
(Past Year: 720)
Joined: 2 Mar 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Postby wrveres » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:18 am

another great read from 2001
;-D

Mark Fischetti
wrveres
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicFantasy ExpertCafe WriterEagle EyeInnovative MemberCafe Musketeer
Posts: 31783
(Past Year: 720)
Joined: 2 Mar 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Postby JTWood » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:22 am

acsguitar wrote:Ok this isn't political but JT brought up saying the destruction from this hurricane doesn't even compare the the destruction of 9/11 or something to that effect.

I want to know what he ment by that. IMO this is way more destruction then 9/11 was.. Probably more deaths Definitly way more property destruction not trying to start an arguement just wanted to know if thats what he ment.

word ;-)

I said it wasn't even comparable because, as you state above, this hurricane's destruction is much, much larger. In New York, the airports were still operational. Many of the roads were still passable.

In New Orleans, half of the airports (I believe) are under water, as is almost every road. The only people who should have access to those modes of communications should be rescue teams and evacuees. That's it.

Sorry for any confusion... ;-D
Image
JTWood
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicCafe WriterEagle EyeWeb Supporter
Posts: 11508
Joined: 22 Jun 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Unincorporated Heaven

Postby Fireball Express » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:23 am

acsguitar wrote:Ok this isn't political but JT brought up saying the destruction from this hurricane doesn't even compare the the destruction of 9/11 or something to that effect.

I want to know what he ment by that. IMO this is way more destruction then 9/11 was.. Probably more deaths Definitly way more property destruction not trying to start an arguement just wanted to know if thats what he ment.

word ;-)


The loss of life may be about the same but I think JT was talking about the size of the area that the disaster effected. A complete city and it's outlying suburbs compared to a small section of Manhattan, One huge building in DC and a small field in PA.
Image
Fireball Express
General Manager
General Manager

User avatar

Posts: 2516
Joined: 17 May 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Basking in the Sunshine

Postby acsguitar » Fri Sep 02, 2005 11:24 am

JTWood wrote:
acsguitar wrote:Ok this isn't political but JT brought up saying the destruction from this hurricane doesn't even compare the the destruction of 9/11 or something to that effect.

I want to know what he ment by that. IMO this is way more destruction then 9/11 was.. Probably more deaths Definitly way more property destruction not trying to start an arguement just wanted to know if thats what he ment.

word ;-)

I said it wasn't even comparable because, as you state above, this hurricane's destruction is much, much larger. In New York, the airports were still operational. Many of the roads were still passable.

In New Orleans, half of the airports (I believe) are under water, as is almost every road. The only people who should have access to those modes of communications should be rescue teams and evacuees. That's it.

Sorry for any confusion... ;-D


Cool was just wondering. ;-D
I'm too lazy to make a sig at the moment
acsguitar
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
Graphics Expert
Posts: 26722
Joined: 7 Apr 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Back in General Talk WOOO!!!

Postby Pablo975 » Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:16 pm

I just got home from filling up my gas tank......I got in line (37th in line) at 6:30am.

8-o

At least the company has frozen the price at 2.69/gallon. ;-D
Image

"Ya'll are brutalizing me!" - Ronwell Dobbs
Pablo975
Minor League Mentor
Minor League Mentor

User avatar

Posts: 969
(Past Year: 3)
Joined: 21 Jan 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Mobile, AL

Postby wrveres » Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:21 pm

Pablo975 wrote:I just got home from filling up my gas tank......I got in line (37th in line) at 6:30am.

8-o

At least the company has frozen the price at 2.69/gallon. ;-D


Wow ..

we haven't had 2.69 a gallon here in months . :-o

..

did you see this Pablo?
This is something could effect you directly in case of future storms. :-o


September 1st:
Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey who flew over the Gulf Coast from Florida to Louisiana said Thursday that most of the Chandeleur chain of barrier islands - the first line of storm defense for eastern Louisiana and western Mississippi - appears to be gone. What is usually a continuous line of dunes is now just marshy outcrops, said Ann Tihansky, a hydrologist with the survey. "It's unbelievable," she said, after reviewing the results of an aerial video survey.

"It just makes the coastline more and more susceptible because more of that storm surge can move further inland," said Glenn Guntenspergen, a U.S. Geological Survey landscape ecologist who has studied the effect of hurricanes on Gulf Coast ecosystems.

With the loss of the islands and wetlands that buffer the region, he said, "It becomes less and less likely for the systems to be able to recover from these kinds of storms. The systems as a whole are rapidly losing their ability to recover.
wrveres
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
CafeholicFantasy ExpertCafe WriterEagle EyeInnovative MemberCafe Musketeer
Posts: 31783
(Past Year: 720)
Joined: 2 Mar 2003
Home Cafe: Baseball

Postby acsguitar » Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:30 pm

wrveres wrote:
Pablo975 wrote:I just got home from filling up my gas tank......I got in line (37th in line) at 6:30am.

8-o

At least the company has frozen the price at 2.69/gallon. ;-D


Wow ..

we haven't had 2.69 a gallon here in months . :-o

..

did you see this Pablo?
This is something could effect you directly in case of future storms. :-o


September 1st:
Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey who flew over the Gulf Coast from Florida to Louisiana said Thursday that most of the Chandeleur chain of barrier islands - the first line of storm defense for eastern Louisiana and western Mississippi - appears to be gone. What is usually a continuous line of dunes is now just marshy outcrops, said Ann Tihansky, a hydrologist with the survey. "It's unbelievable," she said, after reviewing the results of an aerial video survey.

"It just makes the coastline more and more susceptible because more of that storm surge can move further inland," said Glenn Guntenspergen, a U.S. Geological Survey landscape ecologist who has studied the effect of hurricanes on Gulf Coast ecosystems.

With the loss of the islands and wetlands that buffer the region, he said, "It becomes less and less likely for the systems to be able to recover from these kinds of storms. The systems as a whole are rapidly losing their ability to recover.



Yikes...they are gonna need to do some major work there to keep the future floods out
I'm too lazy to make a sig at the moment
acsguitar
Hall of Fame Hero
Hall of Fame Hero

User avatar
Graphics Expert
Posts: 26722
Joined: 7 Apr 2004
Home Cafe: Baseball
Location: Back in General Talk WOOO!!!

Next

Return to General Talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Veceslehake and 3 guests

cron
Forums Articles & Tips Sleepers Rankings Leagues


Today's Games
Thursday, Oct. 2
(All times are EST, weather icons show forecast for game time)

Detroit at Baltimore
(5:37 pm)
Kansas City at LA Angels
(9:07 pm)

  • Fantasy Baseball
  • Article Submissions
  • Privacy Statement
  • Site Survey 
  • Contact