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Postby BaseballFann0008 » Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:02 pm

BobbyRoberto wrote:One of the problems with Little League is that the reason a kid can dominate at that level is just because he's developed faster than other boys his age. So you end up with these mammoth 12-year-olds who need to shave, and who look like they're 18, and they blow fastballs past "normal" 12 year-olds. A few years down the road, the other kids catch up and the Little League phenom is just another player. When I was a kid, I played against the Kirkland Little League World Series Champions (they won in 1982) for the 6 years after their triumph, and their big 12-year-old stud, Cody Webster (also threw 75 MPH at age 12) was a pretty good, but not dominant high school pitcher. He didn't do much of anything in college.

Another problem is the abuse of pitcher's arms that Little League coaches are responsible for. I've seen many good young arms go up in flames from overuse.

As for Harold Reynolds, I'd be surprised if that story turns out to be true. He doesn't seem like a guy who would do that. I met him years ago when I was playing college baseball and he worked out with our team and he was a good guy then and seems to be a good guy now. I don't always agree with what he says on Baseball Tonight, but that story about him doesn't sound like him to me.
that is true, and also these big HR hitters that wont be able to make it next year when the fences are 300 with 90 ft bases its over for them.
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Postby blankman » Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:16 pm

One thing about Little League: the curveball. Not many kids can hit it, so coaches have their pitchers throw it and they destroy their elbows and arms in the process. I believe there have been many kids who haven't been the same after all that abuse. Its sad, really.
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Postby Red Stripe » Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:48 pm

blankman wrote:One thing about Little League: the curveball. Not many kids can hit it, so coaches have their pitchers throw it and they destroy their elbows and arms in the process. I believe there have been many kids who haven't been the same after all that abuse. Its sad, really.


Curveballs can definitely ruin a kid's arm. They shouldn't be thrown until they are at least in high school in my opinion. Throwing them at that early age can rip up an arm so bad while its still being developed, trust me, I know. My coach taught me how to throw a curve when I was about 11 or 12(It was first year of junior high school, don't remember exact age.) I didn't have any dominating speed or anything but I could throw a curve pretty good and it was unhittable for kids my age although after looking back it probably went about 40 mph and was totally predictable. But anyway sophmore year of high school I threw more arm out, didn't have to get surgery or anything but I could barely lift my arm up to get my elbow above my head. It took like 2 years to fully heal and be able to throw normally again at about the end of my senior year and I wasn't nowhere near good enough to play collegeball. I really am against coaches teaching young kids curves because of that.
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Postby ilsa » Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:51 pm

blankman wrote:One thing about Little League: the curveball. Not many kids can hit it, so coaches have their pitchers throw it and they destroy their elbows and arms in the process. I believe there have been many kids who haven't been the same after all that abuse. Its sad, really.


There's a proposition to get rid of the curveball in Little League that is making its rounds at the moment. They already enforce it in our region and there really hasn't been any problems with it the last couple of years.
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Postby BobbyRoberto » Sun Aug 21, 2005 7:55 pm

From what I've read, Nolan Ryan didn't throw a curveball until he was 19. I think kids should play catch more, throw long toss, etc., to build up arm strength, but stay away from curveballs and limit pitches thrown during game competition. Unfortunately, many coaches at that level push too hard to win, at the expense of young pitchers.
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Postby Kingctb27 » Sun Aug 21, 2005 8:20 pm

BobbyRoberto wrote:One of the problems with Little League is that the reason a kid can dominate at that level is just because he's developed faster than other boys his age. So you end up with these mammoth 12-year-olds who need to shave, and who look like they're 18, and they blow fastballs past "normal" 12 year-olds. A few years down the road, the other kids catch up and the Little League phenom is just another player. When I was a kid, I played against the Kirkland Little League World Series Champions (they won in 1982) for the 6 years after their triumph, and their big 12-year-old stud, Cody Webster (also threw 75 MPH at age 12) was a pretty good, but not dominant high school pitcher. He didn't do much of anything in college.

Another problem is the abuse of pitcher's arms that Little League coaches are responsible for. I've seen many good young arms go up in flames from overuse.

As for Harold Reynolds, I'd be surprised if that story turns out to be true. He doesn't seem like a guy who would do that. I met him years ago when I was playing college baseball and he worked out with our team and he was a good guy then and seems to be a good guy now. I don't always agree with what he says on Baseball Tonight, but that story about him doesn't sound like him to me.

I agree, btw, where is Danny Almonte? :-D
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Postby Red Stripe » Sun Aug 21, 2005 9:34 pm

kingctb27 wrote:
BobbyRoberto wrote:One of the problems with Little League is that the reason a kid can dominate at that level is just because he's developed faster than other boys his age. So you end up with these mammoth 12-year-olds who need to shave, and who look like they're 18, and they blow fastballs past "normal" 12 year-olds. A few years down the road, the other kids catch up and the Little League phenom is just another player. When I was a kid, I played against the Kirkland Little League World Series Champions (they won in 1982) for the 6 years after their triumph, and their big 12-year-old stud, Cody Webster (also threw 75 MPH at age 12) was a pretty good, but not dominant high school pitcher. He didn't do much of anything in college.

Another problem is the abuse of pitcher's arms that Little League coaches are responsible for. I've seen many good young arms go up in flames from overuse.

As for Harold Reynolds, I'd be surprised if that story turns out to be true. He doesn't seem like a guy who would do that. I met him years ago when I was playing college baseball and he worked out with our team and he was a good guy then and seems to be a good guy now. I don't always agree with what he says on Baseball Tonight, but that story about him doesn't sound like him to me.

I agree, btw, where is Danny Almonte? :-D


Im pretty sure hes in some high school up in New York now.
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Postby OToddWalker » Mon Aug 22, 2005 10:53 am

BobbyRoberto wrote:One of the problems with Little League is that the reason a kid can dominate at that level is just because he's developed faster than other boys his age.
\


I'm not sure if you watch the MLB, but these guys are much bigger than average men (besides Eckstein, Figgins, etc.). Size is always an issue in sports, despite age. Would Shaq play in the NBA if he was any less than 6'11"? Probably not.
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Postby Matthias » Mon Aug 22, 2005 11:03 am

i love harold reynolds. he knows the game, he knows the players, and he gives good insight. and, to separate himself from the rest of the pack, he does his analysis with a smile and always seems to be about bursting laughing, thinking of a good joke that he was just told. much more pleasant than the commentators who either (granted, largely for show, i'm sure) spend their time denigrating the analysis (and intelligence) of their cohorts, screaming so loudly that they threaten to break my eardrums, or are obviously trying too hard to throw in "hip" catch phrases and nicknames that their whole monologue sounds forced and badly scripted.

basically, i want my commentator to know what he's talking about and give me a perspective that i haven't thought of and be pleasant enough that makes me want to hang out with him. and for that, harold reynolds is great.
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Postby MMoNeY24 » Mon Aug 22, 2005 1:17 pm

kingctb27 wrote:
BobbyRoberto wrote:One of the problems with Little League is that the reason a kid can dominate at that level is just because he's developed faster than other boys his age. So you end up with these mammoth 12-year-olds who need to shave, and who look like they're 18, and they blow fastballs past "normal" 12 year-olds. A few years down the road, the other kids catch up and the Little League phenom is just another player. When I was a kid, I played against the Kirkland Little League World Series Champions (they won in 1982) for the 6 years after their triumph, and their big 12-year-old stud, Cody Webster (also threw 75 MPH at age 12) was a pretty good, but not dominant high school pitcher. He didn't do much of anything in college.

Another problem is the abuse of pitcher's arms that Little League coaches are responsible for. I've seen many good young arms go up in flames from overuse.

As for Harold Reynolds, I'd be surprised if that story turns out to be true. He doesn't seem like a guy who would do that. I met him years ago when I was playing college baseball and he worked out with our team and he was a good guy then and seems to be a good guy now. I don't always agree with what he says on Baseball Tonight, but that story about him doesn't sound like him to me.

I agree, btw, where is Danny Almonte? :-D


MMoNeY24 wrote:By the way, I heard Danny Almonte is playing high school ball in Florida right now, if anyone's interested. :-D


Wikipedia wrote:In early 2005, Danny moved to the Miami, Florida area, where he continues to be a youth club baseball pitcher and notable professional prospect.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danny_Almonte
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