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Definition of a win?

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Definition of a win?

Postby Quaker » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:21 am

How exactly is a pitcher credited with a win? I always thought the pitcher who was credited with the win was the last pitcher to throw when the winning run was scored. However, tonight Prior got the win despite leading 6-3 when he left when the final score was 8-7. I believe Remlinger was the pitcher last in when the Cubs scored the 8th run. Did Prior get the win because the lead was never relinquished?
I don't know why this has never got my attention before.
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Postby Transmogrifier » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:25 am

Yes, to your last question.
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Postby timkell » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:43 am

Yep. I believe whoever is pitching after the fourth inning, with a lead the never gets lost (even if both teams score a lot more runs), get the win.
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Postby jdh » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:45 am

Yes, the starting pitcher gets the win or the loss as long as the lead or deficit that is incurred when they are pitching is never overcome, ie the game becomes a tie or lead changes hands after they leave the game. The only exception to that rule is that a starting pitcher has to pitch at least 5 innings to get the win. If he goes less than 5 innings but would otherwise get the win, the scorer gives the win to the reliever he judges to be most effective. Also, if say a starter leaves with a runner on base in a tie game and the reliever lets the runner score, it would be the starter, not the reliever charged with the loss.
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Postby eftda » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:49 am

A Starting pitcher gets a win if he pitches at least 5 inings and leaves the game with the lead and the ball culb wins without tieing of falling behind

heres an exaple:


a pitcher (Smith), pitches 7 strong inings and the score is 7-1 when he leaves the game, a reliver comes in and gives up 5 runs, so now the score is 7-6, :-o . Smiths team scores 3 more runs in the 8th ining, but the other team comes back to score 3 runs in the top of the 9th. Team smith gets the win even tough the score is 10-9, because when he left the ball game his team was in the lead and the other team failed to tie or go ahead.


does that answer you question

if not, the please let me know ;-D
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Re: Definition of a win?

Postby wrveres » Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:50 am

Quaker wrote:Did Prior get the win because the lead was never relinquished?


Yes
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Postby timkell » Mon Jun 09, 2003 1:31 am

Here's the rule as it is written:
WINNING AND LOSING PITCHER
10.19
(a) Credit the starting pitcher with a game won only if he has pitched at least five complete innings and his team not only is in the lead when he is replaced but remains in the lead the remainder of the game. (b) The "must pitch five complete innings" rule in respect to the starting pitcher shall be in effect for all games of six or more innings. In a five inning game, credit the starting pitcher with a game won if he has pitched at least four complete innings and his team not only is in the lead when he is replaced but remains in the lead the remainder of the game. (c) When the starting pitcher cannot be credited with the victory because of the provisions of 10.19 (a) or (b) and more than one relief pitcher is used, the victory shall be awarded on the following basis: (1) When, during the tenure of the starting pitcher, the winning team assumes the lead and maintains it to the finish of the game, credit the victory to the relief pitcher judged by the scorer to have been the most effective; (2) Whenever the score is tied the game becomes a new contest insofar as the winning and losing pitcher is concerned; (3) Once the opposing team assumes the lead all pitchers who have pitched up to that point are excluded from being credited with the victory except that if the pitcher against whose pitching the opposing team gained the lead continues to pitch until his team regains the lead, which it holds to the finish of the game, that pitcher shall be the winning pitcher;
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Postby eftda » Mon Jun 09, 2003 2:48 am

Where did you get that?

From http://www.mlb.com???
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Postby Dr.DooM » Mon Jun 09, 2003 11:17 am

I think wins is the worst category to evaluate a pitcher. It includes too many extraneous factors and leads to inaccurate conclusions. You can have a pitcher with an ERA of 2.00 and no wins if his team can't score any runs. On the other hand, a mediocre pitcher can accumulate 20 wins with a great offense behind him.

That being said, the only significant information you can gleam from a pitcher with a high win ratio is that he might have the "x-factor." The rare quality in an athlete that lets him kick it up a notch when the going gets tough. David Wells is a good example of a pitcher that may let a few runs through when he's got a big lead; but when the game is close, he'll crank up his performance and shut things down. Players like this tend to do well under pressure. He's not that young anymore but you'll see him do this occasionally.
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